New/Recent Publications

 

Reconstruction: Studies in Contemporary Culture: Archives on Fire: Artifacts & Works, Communities & Fields

Archives and Creation: New Perspectives on Archives. This workbook reports on the work carried out during the third stage (2015-2016) of the project “Archives and creation: new perspectives on archival science.”

Teaching and Learning in Virtual Environments: Archives, Museums, and Libraries, by Patricia C. Franks, Lori A. Bell, and Rhonda B. Trueman.

A Matter of Life and Death: A Critical Examination of the Role of Official Records and Archives in Supporting the Agency of the Forcibly Displaced, by Anne J. Gilliland.

Framing Collaboration: Archives, IRs, and General Collections, by Amy Cooper Cary, Michelle Sweetser, Scott Mandernack, and Tara Baillargeon.

https://mla.hcommons.org/deposits/item/mla:1023/

Digital Heritage. Progress in Cultural Heritage: Documentation, Preservation, and Protection, 6th International Conference, EuroMed 2016, Nicosia, Cyprus, October 31 – November 5, 2016, Proceedings, Part II, Editors: Ioannides, M., Fink, E., Moropoulou, A., Hagedorn-Saupe, M., Fresa, A., Liestøl, G., Rajcic, V., Grussenmeyer, P.

Developing a Primary Source Lab Series: A Collaboration Between Special Collections and Subject Collections Librarians, Adam Rosenkranz, Gale Burrow, and Lisa L. Crane.

A Modern Look At The Banco De’ Medici: Governance And Accountability Systems In Europe’s First Bank Group, by Marco Fazzini, Luigi Fici, Alessandro Montrone, and Simone Terzani.

Archives, memory and colonial resistance in the work of the Portuguese filmmakers Margarida Cardoso and Filipa César, by Antonio Marcio Da Silva.

Sailing into Metrics: Rethinking and Implementing Metrics and Assessment in Archives, by Amy C. Schindler.

Practical Digital Curation Skills for Archivists in the 21st Century, presentation by Myeong Lee, Mary Kendig, Richard Marciano, and Greg Jansen.

Memory hole or right to delist? Implications of the right to be forgotten on web archiving, by Melanie Dulong de Rosnay, Andrés Guadamuz.

What are we talking about when we talk about sustainability of digital archives, repositories and libraries? by Kristin R. Eschenfelder, Kalpana Shankar, Rachel Williams, Allison Lanham, Dorothea Salo, and Mei Zhang.

Mapping the UK information workforce in the library, archives, records, information management, knowledge management and related professions, by Hazel Hall and Robert Raeside.

The retrieval of moving images at spanish film archives: the oversight of content analysis, by Rubén Domínguez-Delgado and María-Ángeles López Hernández.

The Case of the Awgwan: Considering Ethics of Digitization and Access for Archives,
Peterson Brink, Mary Ellen Ducey, and Elizabeth Lorang

Guest Post, Part 1: Are Archives Graduate Programs Adequately Preparing Students for Publishing, Researching, and Writing in the Profession?

Thank you to Joshua Zimmerman, lecturer at San Jose State University’s iSchool, for this fantastic post. His in-depth perspective is in 2 posts and I encourage everyone to read it thoroughly. Josh has great strategies to help emerging professionals prepare for and contribute to the intellectual discourse of archival scholarship. (Read Part 2)

________

Are archives graduate program adequately preparing students for the profession? As an adjunct lecturer in the Masters of Archives and Records Administration (MARA) online master’s degree program in San José State University’s iSchool, this is a question that I’m constantly asking myself as I hear from students and other professionals. For readers of this blog, perhaps a more relevant but related question would be: are archives graduate programs adequately preparing students for publishing, researching, and writing in the profession? As the one responsible for teaching MARA 285 Research Methods in Records Management and Archival Science, I’m extremely concerned with this question. I thought that readers might be interested in how our research and publishing culture is being taught in one small corner of the profession.

As you read this, I want you to think back to how you were introduced to the norms of researching and publishing in our profession? Were these skills taught in your graduate program, did you already have them, or did you have to pick them up later? Finally, what do you wish you would have learned about writing, researching, and publishing in the archives profession as a graduate student? Keep the answers to these questions in mind as you read below. I’d love to know how MARA 285 stacks up to your experiences, good or bad.

Assignments and Assignment Format

The overall structure and framework of MARA 285 is one that I inherited from a colleague, Jason Kaltenbacher who is also an adjunct professor in the MARA program. While my lectures significantly differ from his, I’ve kept the assignments and overall structure basically the same. Other research courses in the iSchool (and in other MLIS programs), I have found, employ a similar assignment format. I ask students to complete an annotated bibliography, topic proposal, literature review, and final proposal. These assignments build on each other and help students complete the steps in putting together both a formal proposal and the framework of a major research project. Since the internet survey has become the preferred data gathering tool of the profession, I also ask them to complete a group survey project where they develop a short internet survey, cover letter, and rationale statement for each question. 

Social Science Focus

When I first took this course on and looked at the assignments and overall structure, I felt that I wanted to radically change the end project to a publishable article. This would be immediately usable to students as they could submit it to journals and present it elsewhere at conferences or on professional or personal blogs. Within the last couple years, my alma mater (Western Washington University) changed their MA thesis requirement to a much smaller publishable article which, I think, seeks to address this aim. Yet, after using the old proposal assignment structure that I inherited for two years, I’ve completely changed my tune.

I discovered just how important it was to snap students out of what I call the “term paper mentality,” an assignment format that most students are particularly used to and, as I’ve discovered, often revert to if given the chance. This course structure offers students the chance to approach a topic systematically, more like a project than a paper. Instead of writing a term paper and trying to wrap up all the loose ends up by the end of the semester, the objective is only to build the structure in order to execute it after the course concludes. This means, that they design the research, but they stop short of sending out the survey, conducting the field work, or digging into records in an archives. I feel that this format ties in better with the assigned textbook chapters that break down different aspects or approaches to research. It also forces students to step back and formalize what they are doing and more importantly, how they plan on doing it. They are asked to put together a research schedule and justify why they are qualified to conduct this research as part of the final proposal.

Challenges, Problems, and Issues

One problem that I encountered during the first year concerned appropriate topic choices. Other courses in the MARA program such as Enterprise Content Management and Digital Preservation or Management of Records and Archival Institutions have clearly defined topic limits. These are built into the course. For instance, you probably can’t write a term paper on medieval recordkeeping for the Enterprise Content Management and Digital Preservation class.

MARA 285, however, is wide almost wide open as far as potential research topics go. That medieval recordkeeping topic is fair game in MARA 285. While there are endless opportunities for topics, there are nevertheless some limitations. I ask that students choose a topic related to the archives, RIM, or library science fields. I encourage students to bring in their interests and give it a records twist. For instance, last year, one military historian in the class designed a project around military recordkeeping. Though the course is taught from a social science perspective, I want students to specifically engage the professional literature of archives and RIM. This year, in addition to some clarifying language and a preemptory blog post on the MARA program website, I’ve added the typology of archives research topics by Couture and Ducharme (1). This typology spells out all the flavors of research conducted in the archives profession (and by extension, RIM). This seemed to have helped students frame their research within the profession.

Another problem that occurred this year was students’ lack of confidence in their professional experience. Unfortunately, due to scheduling, some students take this class as a first year student and in their first semester. To those working in the profession, this might not be a big issue, but for someone who is brand new to the profession, this course might be a bit daunting because it asks students to choose a topic in the profession and develop it over the course of the semester. As mentioned above, I provide guidance on choosing topics in the lecture, but especially for the literature review which asks students to isolate the major literature on their particular topic, this has been stressful or at least it has been related to me as such. This is sometimes daunting for seasoned archivists, let alone first year students. 

Incorporating Perspectives

In addition to the assignments and readings mentioned above, I’ve added a video series called Research in the Wild. In it, the class gets to hear about the research and writing process from other archivists and records managers. I launched it late in the course in 2015 with a few videos, mostly 5-10 minutes. This year, I have a video for nearly each module and hopefully a lot more for next year. Video submissions have addressed specific project-related research challenges as well as more broadly, research agendas, theses, the editing process, differences in publishing in and out of school, and Fulbright Scholarship research among others. In my own archival program, I enjoyed hearing from guest lecturers and talking with archivists and RMs on field trips and it’s these experiences that I’ve tried to recreate. I felt a bit uncomfortable asking archivists and records managers to do free work for me, so I decided to donate to SAA’s Mosaic Scholarship on behalf of those who submit videos. If you’d like to submit a video for next year or know someone who might, please let me know (zimmerj6@gmail.com). From some early feedback from students this year, I’ve learned that the writing process might be more important than I initially thought. So as a result, I’ll be seeking archivists and RIMs who want to talk about this aspect of the profession.

Be a Part of My Book!

Be part of the Society of American Archivists’ new and forthcoming Archival Fundamentals Series! Cheryl Oestreicher, who is authoring the Providing Reference and Access Services in Archives and Manuscripts book, seeks real-world examples and photos that represent the wide variety of institutions, staffing levels, policies, and procedures that exist throughout the profession. Contributions need not be formally written as standalone pieces, as they will be integrated throughout the book itself. Send an e-mail, a couple of paragraphs, or a few sentences about a practice or experience that you found especially useful. Personal photos, website links, social media blurbs, and other online references are welcome. Copies of internal policies and procedures are helpful, and nothing will be published without your explicit permission. Contributions also can be anonymized upon request. Depending upon the amount of and types of suggestions, some may not be included in the final book.

Simply send an email to: ccoest@gmail.com with the subject line “Reference and Access Book Contribution.” Thank you for helping us to produce a better book!

The following is a list of potential contributions:

  • reading room photos
  • access policies
  • loan policies
  • accessibility of facilities/ADA compliance
  • virtual reading room
  • copyright, registration, reproduction, publishing, etc. forms
  • ethical decisions about access
  • dealing with difficult patrons
  • unusual patron types and experiences
  • unusual disciplines/research projects
  • how do institutional staff use/request records, what materials are they looking for and why
  • reference manuals
  • when archivists do research (beyond standard reference interactions)
  • reference training documents/procedures
  • copying/reproduction policies
  • internal metrics, tracking statistics
  • assessment of reference interactions; post-visit surveys
  • how do you staff reference services: rotation, designated reference desk, subject/curatorial specialists, etc.
  • marketing and outreach strategies (not examples of individual activities, but overall strategies)

Call for Proposals: Concordia University Library’s 15th Annual Research Forum

Le texte en français suit plus bas.

Proposals are now being accepted for Concordia University Library’s 15th Annual Research Forum, in the beautiful city of Montreal.  This year’s Research Forum will be held on Friday, April 28th, 2017, at the Loyola Jesuit Hall and Conference Centre.

The Research Forum provides an opportunity for librarians, archivists, graduate students, teaching faculty, and information professionals to describe and promote their completed or in-progress research, practical case studies or projects. The Forum also provides a venue for researchers to seek suggestions for enhancing their research interests, to identify potential new partners for projects, to test the effectiveness of their undertakings, and to promote research in academic libraries.

This year’s keynote speaker is Miguel Figueroa. Mr. Figueroa works at the Center for the Future of Libraries, an initiative from the American Library Association. He has previously held positions at the American Theological Library Association; ALA’s Office for Diversity and Office for Literacy and Outreach Services; NYU’s Ehrman Medical Library; and Neal-Schuman Publishers. He is a graduate of the University of Arizona’s Knowledge River Program, an initiative that examines library issues from Hispanic and Native American perspectives.

Call for Proposals

Proposals are invited for presentations and / or posters on research or a case study in any area of Library and Information Science including literacy instruction, social media, library history, citation analysis methods, scholarly publishing, services to users with disabilities, new library technologies, resource sharing, research data management, reference service models and innovations, library space and design.

Presentations and posters may be in English or French.

At least one of the presenters of the poster and/or presentation should be the primary researcher involved with the original project.

Presentations should be between 15 and 20 minutes, followed by a question period.

Posters may also be submitted. These will be on view for the entire day. Poster presenters will have an opportunity to describe their posters during the day.

Submission deadline: Monday, February 6, 2017, 9 a.m.

For more information, please visit: http://library.concordia.ca/about/staff/forum

To submit a proposal, please click here.

For more information about the Concordia University Library’s 15th Annual Research Forum please contact Krista Alexander, Chair of the Librarians’ Research Forum Committee at Krista.Alexander@concordia.ca .

Warm regards,

The Librarians’ Research Forum Committee
Krista Alexander (Chair)
Guylaine Beaudry
Kathleen Botter
Melissa Rivosecchi

≈≈≈≈≈≈≈≈≈≈≈≈≈≈≈≈≈≈≈≈≈≈≈≈≈≈≈≈≈≈≈≈≈≈≈≈≈≈≈≈≈≈≈≈≈≈≈≈≈≈≈≈≈≈≈≈≈≈≈≈≈≈≈≈≈≈≈≈≈≈

Vous êtes invités à soumettre une proposition de communication ou d’affiche pour le 15e Forum annuel de recherche en bibliothéconomie et sciences de l’information de la Bibliothèque de l’Université Concordia, à Montréal. Le Forum de recherche de cette année aura lieu le vendredi 28 avril 2017, au Centre des congrès des Jésuites de Loyola.

Le Forum de recherche donne l’occasion aux bibliothécaires, aux archivistes, aux étudiants des cycles supérieurs, aux professeurs des cégeps et des universités ainsi qu’aux praticiens des milieux documentaires de présenter leur projet de recherche ou un retour d’expérience, qu’ils soient en cours ou complétés. Le Forum est également un lieu pour les chercheurs qui souhaitent recevoir des suggestions et des commentaires sur leur projet de recherche, rencontrer de nouveaux partenaires, tester l’intérêt de leur approche ou promouvoir la recherche dans les bibliothèques universitaires.

Le conférencier principal est Miguel Figueroa.  Monsieur Figueroa travaille au Center for the Future of Libraries, une initiative de la  American Library Association (ALA).  Auparavant, il a travaillé à la American Theological Library Association, au Bureau pour la diversité et au Bureau pour la litéracie et le rayonnement de l’ALA, à la bibliothèque médicale Ehrman de l’Université de New York et chez les éditeurs Neal-Schuman.  Il est diplômé du programmeKnowledge River de l’Université d’Arizona, une initiative qui d’intéresse aux questions bibliothéconomiques du point de vue des Premières Nations et du peuple hispanique.

Appel à propositions

Vous êtes invités à proposer des communications et des affiches sur des sujets de recherche ou des retours d’expérience de les domaines de la bibliothéconomie et des sciences de l’information, y compris le développement des compétences informationnelles, les médias sociaux, l’histoire des bibliothèques, la bibliométrie, l’édition savante, les services aux utilisateurs handicapés, les technologies de la bibliothèque, le partage des ressources, la gestion des données de recherche, les modèles de services de référence et les innovations en matière de conception d’espaces de bibliothèque.

Les communications et les affiches peuvent être présentées en anglais ou en français.

Au moins un des auteurs d’une communication ou d’une affiche doit être impliqué dans la recherche présentée.

Chaque communication doit durer entre 15 et 20 minutes et est suivie d’une période de questions.

Vous êtes également invités à proposer des affiches. Celles-ci seront accessibles tout au long de la journée, et les auteurs des affiches auront la possibilité de les présenter.

La date limite pour les soumissions est le lundi 6 février 2017, 9h.

Pour plus d’informations : http://library.concordia.ca/about/staff/forum/francais.php

Pour soumettre, cliquez ici.

Pour plus d’informations sur 15e Forum annuel de recherche de la Bibliothèque de l’Université Concordia, veuillez communiquer avec Krista Alexander, présidente du comité organisateur du Forum de recherche (Krista.Alexander@concordia.ca).

Cordialement,

Le comité de recherche du Forum des bibliothécaires
Krista Alexander (Responsable du comité)
Guylaine Beaudry
Kathleen Botter
Melissa Rivosecchi

Call for Applications: Institute for Research Design in Librarianship

This is geared towards librarians, but the completed projects list two archives-related projects.

The deadline for applications to IRDL 2017 has been extended TWO WEEKS. Applications are now due on January 27, 2017.

We are issuing a call for applications for the Institute for Research Design in Librarianship (IRDL) 2017. We are seeking novice librarian researchers who are employed by academic libraries or research libraries outside an academic setting in the United States to participate in the Institute. We define “novice” broadly; if you feel that you would benefit from being guided throughout the entire research design process, we encourage your application. Librarians of all levels of professional experience are welcome to apply.

The year-long experience begins with a workshop held on the campus of Loyola Marymount University in Los Angeles, California, from June 4-10, 2017, with arrival on campus on Saturday, June 3, and departure on Sunday, June 11.

The William H. Hannon Library has received a second three-year grant from the Institute for Museum and Library Services (IMLS) to offer this continuing education opportunity (this grant, IRDL-2, is from 2016-2019). Each year 20 librarians will receive, at no cost to them, instruction in research design and a full year of peer/mentor support to complete a research project at their home institutions; the learning experience, travel to and from Los Angeles, CA, accommodations, and food will be supplied to Scholars free of charge.

We seek librarians with a passion for research and a desire to improve their research skills. IRDL is designed to bring together all that the literature tells us about the necessary conditions for librarians to conduct valid and reliable research in an institutional setting. The cohort will be chosen from a selective submission process, with an emphasis on enthusiasm for research and diversity from a variety of perspectives, including ethnicity and type and size of library.

Selection criteria:

  • Commitment to the year-long process of participating in the IRDL research community and conducting the proposed study within the 2017-2018 academic year;
  • Significance of the research problem to the operational success of libraries or to the profession of librarianship;
  • Thoughtfulness, thoroughness, and clarity of the research proposal;
  • Enthusiasm for research and a desire to learn.

We will be accepting applications from December 1, 2016 to January 13, 2017. Scholars accepted to the Institute will be notified in early March 2017. Application information may be found at http://irdlonline.org/call-for-proposals/institute-overview/.

Please contact Project Directors with any questions about the Institute or the application process:
Marie Kennedy, Serials & Electronic Resources Librarian, Loyola Marymount University (marie.kennedy@lmu.edu)
Kristine Brancolini, Dean of the Library, Loyola Marymount University (brancoli@lmu.edu)

Chris Marino, Reference + Outreach Archivist
Environmental Design Archives
University of California
230 Wurster Hall mc 1820
Berkeley, CA 94720-1820
510.642.5124

Call for Participants/Presentations: SAA Research Forum

excerpt from Archival Outlook:

If you’re engaged in research, seeking to identify research-based solutions for your institution, willing to participate in the research cycle by serving as a beta site for research trials, or simply interested in what’s happening in research and innovation, then join us for the 11th annual SAA Research Forum: “Foundations and Innovations”!

Researchers, practitioners, educators, students, and the curious across all sectors of archives and records management are invited to participate. Use the Forum to discuss, debate, plan, organize, evaluate, or motivate research projects and initiatives. The event seeks to facilitate collaboration and help inform researchers about what questions and problems need to be tackled.

Read more: http://www.bluetoad.com/publication/?i=376049&p=18.

The Research Forum will be Tuesday, July 25, 9 am-5 pm, Oregon Convention Center.

New/Recent Publications and Scholarship

The Care of Prints and Drawings, Second Edition. By Margaret Holben Ellis. Rowman & Littlefield.

Latinos in Libraries, Museums, and Archives, Cultural Competence in Action! An Asset-Based Approach. By Patricia Montiel-Overall; Annabelle Villaescusa Nunez; Veronica Reyes-Escudero.  Rowman & Littlefield.

The Dictionary of the Book: A Glossary for Book Collectors, Booksellers, Librarians, and Others. By Sidney E. Berger. Rowman & Littlefield.

Out of the Box: Meddling With Medieval Manuscripts. M Hicks, S Mielczarski. The Journal of Purdue Undergraduate Research.

Book History Scholarship: Creation, Transmission of Knowledge and Archives. By Ojeda, Danné; Lommen, Mathieu. Visible Language

Digital archives, cultural identity and diversity, meaning economy. Peter Stockinger. Council of Europe Conference.

Rethinking the Archives: History Lectures for the Health Sciences. By Sandra Bandy and Renee Sharrock. Augusta University Libraries.

Availability of Russian archives and illusion of the source study updating: What Russian and foreign researches dealing with the documents should know. A. Litvin. Kazan Federal University Digital Repository.

Querying Queer African Archives: Methods and Movements. By Thérèse Migraine-George, Ashley Currier. Women’s Studies Quarterly.

Qualitative psychology and the archive: Introduction to the special section. By Cristian Tileagă and Jovan Byford. Qualitative Psychology.

Bridging the Gap: Selected Works and TopScholar Galleries. By Sue Lynn McDaniel and Todd J. Seguin. Kentucky Convergence Conference.