CFP Extended: Provenance

Provenance is extending the CFP for its upcoming issue to September 15, 2017. Please share with any colleagues who may have a paper or research project that could be converted into an article for publication. The board and editors of Provenance are happy to work with authors to encourage their contribution to professional scholarship. Do not hesitate to contact me if you have any questions.

CFP: 2017 issue of Provenance

Provenance: The Journal of the Society of Georgia Archivists, a peer reviewed academic publication, seeks articles on archival theory and practice for the 2017 issue. Please note that the content of the journal is not limited to the state of Georgia, and articles of regional or national significance are welcome. First-time authors are especially encouraged to submit articles for consideration. As evidenced by the forthcoming audiovisual issue, composed of video, audio, and traditional article formats, Provenance is also interested in innovative and unique methods for presenting scholarly content.

Articles on archival topics outside of theory and practice which meet publication standards will also be considered. Typical papers should be a Word document, 10-20 pages, double spaced, and formatted according to the 16th edition of the Chicago Manual of Style. Please review information for contributors: http://digitalcommons.kennesaw.edu/provenance/policies.html.

Articles are to be submitted utilizing Provenance’s new online system: http://digitalcommons.kennesaw.edu/provenance/.

For additional information contact Editor Heather Oswald at: provenance@soga.org. Deadline for contributions is September 15, 2017.

Gracy Award 

Each year the SGA awards the Gracy Award, a $350 prize which recognizes a superior contribution to Provenance. Named for David B. Gracy II, founder and first editor of Georgia Archive, the award began in 1990 and is judged by the editorial board.

*Back issues of Provenance and Georgia Archive available online*

Table of Contents for the 2016 issue:

2016 Society of Georgia Archivists and Society of Florida Archivists Joint Annual Meeting Keynote Address

Defining Archives: Ingenuity, Innovation, and New Perspectives
Dr. Meredith Evans

Articles

“I Go to School, But I Never Learn What I Want to Know”: Archival Advocacy and Outreach as Expressed in Formal Educational Settings
Jeremy Brett, Jasmine Jones, and Leah Edleman

A Shared Space: The Collaborative Alliance Between the College of Charleston Special Collections and the South Carolina Historical Society Archives
Mary Jo Fairchild, Joshua Minor, and Molly Inabinett

Reviews 

Becoming a Trusted Digital Repository
Reviewed by Katy Sternberger

Digital Preservation Essentials
Reviewed by Brandon Wason

Teaching with Primary Sources
Reviewed by Donnie Summerlin

Donors and Archives: A Guidebook for Successful Programs
Reviewed by Joshua Minor

Archives in Libraries: What Librarians and Archivists Need to Know to Work Together
Reviewed by Amanda Pellerin

Adjusted Margin: Xerography, Art, and Activism in the 20th Century
Reviewed by Erin Lawrimore

Appraisal and Acquisition Strategies
Reviewed by Carol Waggoner-Angleton

Conceptualizing 21st Century Archives
Reviewed by Anne Graham

Perspectives on Women’s Archives
Reviewed by Katy Sternberger

 

Advertisements

Special New Issue: Provenance

When I was still Provenance Editor, I started the process of a special audiovisual issue. From the start, then Associate Editor and now Editor Heather Oswald took the reigns. I’m excited to see it is now available!

What makes this issue different is that some of the content is audiovisual “articles.” The goal was to not have a print/text only issue, but experiment with AV as content. I hope to see more of this not just in Provenance but other journals as well!

Current Issue: Volume 34, Number 1 (2016) Audiovisual Issue

Front Matter

Front Matter
Heather Oswald

Editor’s Note
Heather Oswald

Articles

Opening Access to Fresh Air’s Archives
Melody Kramer and Anu Paul

The Digitizing of ’34
Traci JoLeigh Drummond and Kathryn Michaelis

From Basement Storage to Online Access: Processing and Digitizing the Mathematical Association of America General Mathematics Film Production Elements
Justin Kovar

University Of Maryland Madrigal Singers 1964 Tour
Eric Cartier

Art of Defiance: Found Footage, Legal Provenance, and the “Aesthetics of Access”
Claudy W. Op den Kamp

“Is This Enough?” Digitizing Liz Lerman Dance Exchange Archives Media
Bria Parker, Robin C. Pike, and Vincent Novara

Moving Forward: Enhancing Preservation of and Access to Oral Histories at UNLV University Libraries
Karla Irwin

Some Remarks on Motion Picture Film Digitization and Communicating Expectations to Digitization Vendors
John Christian Lott and Alexnader Kroh

Demonstrating Playback: Two Legacy Videotape Machines in Action
Michael Angeletti

Playback Equipment: Interviews with AV Professionals
Alicia Esquivel

Words Painting Pictures: Indexing the H. Lee Waters Project using OHMS
Craig Breaden

Back Matter

CFP: Provenance

Provenance: The Journal of the Society of Georgia Archivists, a peer reviewed academic publication, seeks articles on archival theory and practice for the 2016 issue. Please note that the content of the journal is not limited to the state of Georgia, and articles of regional or national significance are welcome. First-time authors are especially encouraged to submit articles for consideration. As evidenced by the forthcoming audiovisual issue, composed of video, audio, and traditional article formats, Provenance is also interested in innovative and unique methods for presenting scholarly content.

Articles on archival topics outside of theory and practice which meet publication standards will also be considered. Typical papers should be a Word document, 10-20 pages, double spaced, and formatted according to the 16th edition of the Chicago Manual of Style. Please review information for contributors: http://digitalcommons.kennesaw.edu/provenance/policies.html. Articles are to be submitted utilizing Provenance’s online system: http://digitalcommons.kennesaw.edu/provenance/.

For additional information contact Editor Heather Oswald at: provenance@soga.org. Deadline for contributions is July 31, 2016.

Gracy Award 

Each year the SGA awards the Gracy Award, a $350 prize which recognizes a superior contribution to Provenance. Named for David B. Gracy II, founder and first editor of Georgia Archive, the award began in 1990 and is judged by the editorial board.

*Back issues of Provenance and Georgia Archive available online*

At nearly 50,000 hits/downloads, the back issues (1972-2015) are a great
resource for archivists: http://digitalcommons.kennesaw.edu/provenance/

————–

The 2015 print issue is on its way to subscribers now, and will be publicly available online following a year long embargo for membership benefit. Become a member today!

Table of Contents for the 2015 issue:

2015 Society of Georgia Archivists Annual Meeting Keynote Address
Only Connect: Communities, Archives and the Making and Keeping of Memory
Jeannette A. Bastian

Articles

 A Push in the Right Direction: Expanding Models of Mentorship
Lynette Stoudt, Caitlin Birch, Michelle Chiles, Luciana Spracher, Darla White

Time, Money and Effort: A Practical Approach to Digital Content Management
Christine S. Wiseman, Alfred S. Matthews

Our Love Won’t Fade Away: Processing the Jerry Garcia Memorial Altar Collection
Scott J. Carlson

Archivists and Faculty Collaborative Course Development
Courtney Chartier, Gabrielle M. Dudley, Donna Troka

The Right to Know … Or Not: The Freedom of Information Act, 1955-1974
Tommy C. Brown

Hoarding and Its Effects on Acquisition and Appraisal: Two Case Studies from the University of Illinois Archives
Roxanne M. Dunn

The Case of Stanly Will
Ryan Speer

Reviews

Gorman, Our Enduring Values Revisited: Librarianship in an Ever-Changing World
Reviewed by Debra Branson March

Santamaria, Extensible Processing for Archives and Special Collections: Reducing Processing Backlogs
Reviewed by Michael Nagy

Caldera and Neal, Through the Archival Looking Glass: A Reader on Diversity and Inclusion
Reviewed by Laura Starratt

Behrnd-Klodt and Prom, eds. Rights in the Digital Era
Reviewed by Mandy Mastrovita

Delve and Anderson, Preserving Complex Digital Objects
Reviewed by Carol Waggoner-Angleton

Corrado and Moulaison, Digital Preservation for Libraries, Archives, and Museums
Reviewed by Grant Maher

Eichhorn, The Archival Turn in Feminism: Outrage in Order
Reviewed by Cheryl Oestreicher

Cloonon, Preserving Our Heritage: Perspectives from Antiquity to the Digital Age
Reviewed by Michael Law

Theimer, ed., Educational Programs: Innovative Practices for Archives and Special Collections
Reviewed by Pamela Nye

Pénichon, Twentieth-Century Color Photographs: Identification and Care
Reviewed by Mandi D. Johnson

Bradley, Social Media for Creative Libraries
Reviewed by Amanda Pellerin

Heather Oswald

Editor, Provenance, Journal of the Society of Georgia Archivists

Finalizing a Journal Issue

Putting together a journal issue requires a lot of steps and details. As I finish my last issue of Provenance, I thought people might be interested in steps required to finalize an issue.

The editor facilitates the peer-review process, assigning submissions to reviewers. Once those reviews are complete, the editor takes that feedback to register a decision. For Provenance, it is accept with minor revisions, accept with major revisions, and declined. Submitters receive that notification along with the reviewers’ feedback. Generally, this happens throughout spring and summer, with the most submissions received around the end of July due date. Once it is known which articles are selected for publication, then the bulk of an editor’s job begins.

All articles need some editing. There is always a mix of minor, some, and major editing needed. There’s generally 1-2 articles that only need a few minor edits, mostly technical with an occasional clarification. Next are articles that require a thorough editing, primarily technical with perhaps a few questions/clarifications. Last, there are articles that go through several drafts before being publication ready. These authors have solid and strong ideas, but need to rewrite/rework paragraphs or sections, reorganize, the article, incorporate additional research (generally only one or two articles or books to support their statements), or heavier copyediting. The latter, of course, is often hard and stressful for the author, but my ultimate goal is to bring out the best in their writing.

This back and forth with authors for edit can go on for several weeks. What I do as editor is check grammar, punctuation, footnotes for proper citations and formatting, credit/citation for photographs, charts in black and white (only our cover is in color), proper use of quotes, section headings, clear articulation of arguments and evidence, and so forth. I want to retain the authors’ voices and do my best not to rewrite, though I will sometimes offer suggestions. For example: if there is a confusing section I will note that and ask for clarification; I’ll ask for citations if they were not included; or ask for reduction/expansion of thoughts or arguments.

Generally, I make a first pass for all these possibilities and return to the author with tracked changes and comments. The author will then return it with further edits and respond to comments. I try to communicate that most are just suggestions. I have had authors clarify why they don’t want to make a suggested change and I honor those requests. Then, I ask the authors to sign publishing agreements and provide short biographies. I also make sure I have addresses for non-SGA member authors.

After the content is more or less final, then I will start formatting to adhere to Provenance standards, meaning The Chicago Manual of Style 16th edition. Across all articles, I make formatting changes for consistency such as title/author headings, section headings, use of numbers, citation format, font size, paragraph spacing, etc. This goes for the articles, reviews, and any other content (like editor’s notes). It’s very gratifying to see all of that come together.

When this is complete, I decide on the table of contents. It’s subjective, but my goal is to make the reading flow well. As Provenance publishes any topic related to archives, it’s seldom that two articles are on the same topic (at least in my tenure). Sometimes it’s easy, but with the current issue which will have 7 articles, it was hard to decide.

I also do both the front and back matter. The front matter includes picking a cover photo, updating the editorial board list, and the table of contents. The cover image is sometimes easy and sometimes hard. If an article includes photos, I try to use one of those. Last year there were no photos, so I worked with an author to create an image. The 2011 issue included original artwork. As a teaser, what will be on the upcoming issue is my favorite yet. It was provided by a professional photographer who graciously allowed us to use it at no charge. Regardless of where the image comes from, it directly ties into one of the articles. The back matter is the easiest: updating the SGA board list and information for contributors.

Editors of some journals write an editor’s note for each issue. I’ve written a few, but not for every issue. I did choose to write one this year, as it is my last issue. I previously wrote ones for the special issues completed. That is entirely up to the editor.

At last, finalizing the issue is getting closer. Once I have all of this complete, I send it to the managing editor for markup. She will fix any technical issues I may have missed, format it in Publisher, and assign page numbers. After that is complete, individual PDFs are sent to the authors for one final review. At this stage, only minor corrections are completed. I review the entire issue one more time and also give any corrections.

Once all the authors approve their articles, the managing editor will fix anything necessary then work with the printer. She coordinates the printing and mailing. She works with SGA to compile a mailing list that includes members and non-member authors. We decide on a number to print, as two copies go to the SGA archives and we want to have a few extra for individual purchase or replacement. We go into the printers’ queue, so we never quite know how long it will take. But generally 4-6 weeks later, it arrives in the mail. It’s always a happy day when I see the result of the work of so many people.

Why I Resigned as Provenance Editor

After four wonderful years, I have resigned as Provenance Editor. I originally planned to finish out my second term (another 2 years). However, as I wrote about a couple weeks ago, I signed a contract to write a book. Over the past couple months as I tried to balance being an editor and writing a book, I discovered that something needed to give.

As I explained to a colleague, being an editor and author use the same part of my brain that requires a lot of concentration, focus, and thought. Spending time editing/reviewing articles and then trying to research and write is quite taxing on both my brain and my motivation.

Many of us have the challenge of taking on too much and becoming stressed or burned out. And many of us have a hard time saying “no.” I’ve been practicing saying “no” over the past few years and am getting better. Often, we are afraid people will judge us for quitting. However, I believe that instead it’s more important to recognize our limitations. By doing so, it will be better all around. If I continued to be an editor and an author, likely both projects would suffer. And both are too important to me to let that happen. Instead, my resignation means that both will be successful – me being able to focus on the book and my successor as Editor will take Provenance to new heights.

When I took over, the previous editor encouraged me to do whatever I wanted with the journal. While it took time to learn the ropes, I definitely made it my own. Under my leadership, all the back issues are online, we moved to an online submission system, we are receiving more submissions than in the past, and there’s greater awareness of the journal. We have two special issues (one on advocacy and one with SNAP), with a third in the works.

I’ve learned more than I can possibly explain being an editor. Not only did I learn about publishing, but communication, needs of the profession, how to work with authors, practices and theories used by colleagues, and challenges of scholarship. I had great support from SGA and the Provenance Board. Most of all, the role cemented my passion about publishing as a focus for my professional activities. I dedicated what feels like countless hours to the journal over the past four years. While I will miss it, I am also relieved to know I can focus on one major project.

I am handing the reins over to Heather Oswald at Emory University. I told her what I was told, that she should take it and make it her own. As I’ve worked with her on the Provenance Board and as Associated Editor over the last couple years, I know she will continue to build upon what I’ve done as well as create new directions and initiatives. I’m excited to see what the future brings.

This decision has no impact on this blog. I am dedicated to continuing this as a platform to share ideas and practices about scholarly publishing in the profession. I’ll continue to use my experience as an editor and now as an author. There’s much to be said about publishing and I hope others continue to suggest ideas and contribute posts.

Provenance: SNAP Special Issue

I’m pleased to share that the online SNAP Special Issue of Provenance is now available: http://digitalcommons.kennesaw.edu/provenance/.

In the nearly four years I’ve been Provenance Editor, I’ve had many conversations with authors and potential authors about the different facets of journal publishing. I contacted SAA’s SNAP (Students and New Archives Professionals) Roundtable, and they were enthusiastic about this opportunity. As students and new professionals learn the profession, they are exposed to numerous books and other literature. The publishing process can be daunting, and engaging new authors helps demystify the submission, peer-review, and editorial processes.

SNAP members participated in the submission and editing process from start to finish. This was an opportunity for SNAP members to be responsible for the content of an entire issue, including soliciting articles, being the peer-reviewers, and editing. I provided guidance and direction to the editors, Jennifer Welch coordinated with the guest Reviews Editor, and Erin Lawrimore served as Managing Editor, but the issue represents the voices of students and new professionals. Caitlin Wells and Roxanne Dunn did an excellent job as guest Editors. They worked extensively with authors, made decisions, and asked questions.

It was my pleasure to work with SNAP on this issue. I hope that this experience encourages these new authors and editors to continue to contribute to archival scholarship for years to come.

Reminder: CFP Provenance Audiovisual Special Issue

Provenance recognizes the evolving needs within the profession and is working to address those changes when possible. For example, we published a special issue on advocacy in September 2013 (http://digitalcommons.kennesaw.edu/provenance/).

Provenance would like to create a special issue dedicated to audiovisual archives and archivists. Despite two journals dedicated to archival audiovisual topics (http://www.iasa-web.org/iasa-journal and http://www.arsc-audio.org/journal.html), Provenance will take a different approach. What we propose is to create an issue where there may be written content, but the bulk of it would be original audio and visual “articles.” Submissions should be specifically about processes, procedures, projects, collecting, digitizing, providing access, or other aspects about managing audiovisual collections.

Following the model of innovative projects such as “More Podcast, Less Process,” we are seeking alternative means of disseminating research and ideas. Audio and video are powerful tools for demonstrating practices, projects, policies, or other content. We invite you to be creative in how you utilize these formats.

Proposals should be up to 750 words and include an abstract of the project, why an audiovisual/written format is ideal to present the topic, and the type/format of the proposed submission. As this is a new format for Provenance, proposals will be reviewed by the Editors for creativity, clarity of thesis/topic, and appropriateness to audiovisual formats. Editors will provide guidance and additional specifications to accepted authors to ensure a high-quality end product.

Suggested submissions include but are not limited to:

  • virtual tour or review of tool or procedure
  • podcasts
  • video tutorial
  • written article combined with audio or video or procedures

Submissions should not be:

  • recordings of conference presentations
  • entire oral histories or digitally reformatted materials

This will be published as an online-only issue, openly available to everyone, in fall of 2016. We recognize that because this process is new, we want to provide enough time for submission, review, and edits to produce an issue. The suggested timeline is as follows:

September 2015 – send out call for proposals
November 15, 2015 – proposals due
December 2015 – editors select proposals and notify all submitters
May 15, 2016 – deadline for final submissions
May-June 2016 – editorial review of submissions
July 2016 – minor revisions of submissions (if needed)
August 2016 – final review by authors/editors
September 2016 – published online (http://digitalcommons.kennesaw.edu/provenance/)

Written submissions can be submitted via the online system: http://digitalcommons.kennesaw.edu/provenance/. Audiovisual submissions can be emailed or shared through Google Drive/Dropbox to the Editor at provenance@soga.org.

Formats:

  • Audio files should be in .mp3 format; video files in .mp4 format.
  • Contributors can also provide embed codes from YouTube, Kaltura, or others if his/her institution utilizes other platforms.
  • All submissions should include a transcript of the audio or video to increase discoverability.
  • No minimum nor maximum word length for traditional article submissions.
  • Consult with Editors for other options.

Written submissions should adhere to established guidelines: http://digitalcommons.kennesaw.edu/provenance/policies.html. Audiovisual submissions will not be peer-reviewed in the traditional sense. Because there are no standard guidelines for reviewing audiovisual content, the focus will be on quality of viewing and content. This process will be flexible and is subject to change.

Provenance looks forward to working with you!

Thank you,

Cheryl Oestreicher
Editor, Provenance, Journal of the Society of Georgia Archivists
provenance@soga.org

Heather Oswald
Associate Editor, Provenance, Journal of the Society of Georgia Archivists
hoswald@kennesaw.edu

Jennifer Welch
Reviews Editor, Provenance, Journal of the Society of Georgia Archivists
jwelch30@uthsc.edu