SAA Case Studies

SAA announced a new Campus Case Study, “Successful Fundraising with Library and
Archives Collaboration.” SAA started this series geared towards academic archives, but often the studies offer insight and tips to any type of institution.

More recently, the case studies have expanded and there are now openly accessible case studies on ethics, diversifying the archival record, and government records.

These are also a good publishing opportunity. Recognizing the benefit of these to the profession, SAA is open to expanding the contributing groups.  They are much shorter than journal-article length, good for collaborative writing, and allow to share real-life experiences and practices.

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New Issue: SLIS Connecting

Volume 6, Issue 1 (2017)
(open access)

Columns

SLIS Director’s Update
USM School of Library and Information Science

Spotlights: Faculty, Alum, and Courses

USM School of Library and Information Science

From the GAs: Congratulations, Publications, Presentations

USM School of Library and Information Science

Student Associations: News and Events

USM School of Library and Information Science

Articles

Emerging Roles: Academic Libraries Crossing the Digital Divide

Scott A. Manganello

CFP: VIEW Special Issue “Audiovisual Data in Digital Humanities”

Considering the relevance of audiovisual material as perhaps the biggest wave of data to come in the near future (Smith, 2013, IBM prospective study) its relatively modest position within the realm of Digital Humanities conferences is remarkable. The objective of this special issue for VIEW is to present current research in that field on a variety of epistemological, historiographical and technological issues that are specific for digital methods applied to audiovisual data. We strive to cover a great range of media and data types and of applications representing the various stages of the research process.

The following key topics / problems / questions are of special interest:

  1. Do computational approaches to sound and (moving) images extend or/and change our conceptual and epistemological understanding of these media? What are the leading machine learning approaches to the study of audio and visual culture and particularly time-based media? How do these approaches, models, and methods of learning relate to acquiring and producing knowledge by the conventional means of reading and analyzing text? Do we understand the 20th century differently through listening to sounds and voices and viewing images than through reading texts? How does massive digitization and online access relate to the concept of authenticity and provenance?
  2. What tools in the sequence of the research process – search, annotation, vocabulary, analysis, presentation – are best suited to work with audio-visual data? The ways in which we structure and process information are primarily determined by the convention of attributing meaning to visual content through text. Does searching audio-visual archives, annotating photos or film clips, analyzing a corpus of city sounds, or presenting research output through a virtual exhibition, require special dedicated tools? What is the diversity in requirements within the communities of humanities scholars? How can, for example, existing commercial tools or software be repurposed for scholarly use?
  3. What are the main hurdles for the further expansion of AV in DH? Compared to text, audiovisual data as carriers of knowledge are a relatively young phenomenon. Consequently the question of ‘ownership’ and the commercial value of many audiovisual sources result in considerable constraints for use due to issues of copyright. A constraint of a completely different order, is the intensive investment in time needed when listening to or watching an audiovisual corpus, compared to reading a text. Does the law or do technologies for speech and image retrieval offer solutions to overcome these obstacles?

Practicals
Contributions are encouraged from authors with different kinds of expertise and interests in media studies, digital humanities, television and media history.
Paper proposals (max. 500 words) are due on October 2nd , 2017.
Submissions should be sent to the managing editor of the journal, Dana Mustata.
A notice of acceptance will be sent to authors in the 1st week of November 2017.
Articles (3 – 6,000 words) will be due on 15 th of February 2018. Longer articles are welcome, given that they comply with the journal’s author guidelines.
For further information or questions about the issue, please contact the co-editors: Mark Williams (Associate Professor Film and Media Studies, Dartmouth College U.S.), Pelle Snickars (Prof. of Media Studies Umea Univesity, Sweden) or Andreas Fickers (Luxembourg Centre for Contemporary and Digital History).

About VIEW Journal
See http://www.viewjournal.eu/ for the current and back issues. VIEW is supported by the EUscreen Network and published by the Netherlands Institute for Sound and Vision in collaboration with Utrecht University, Royal Holloway University of London, and University of Luxembourg. VIEW is proud to be an open access journal. All articles are indexed through the Directory of Open Access Journals, the EBSCO Film and Television Index, Paperity and NARCIS.

Recent Issue: RUIDERAe: Revista de Unidades de Informacion

RUIDERAe: Revista de Unidades de Informacion, No. 11 (2017)
The Archive is not an island: transversality and cooperation in archives.
(in Spanish, open access)

TRANSVERSALITY AND MANAGEMENT: DOCUMENTS AND DATA AT THE SERVICE OF DECISION-MAKING AND TRANSPARENCY
Montserrat García-Alsina

“A GRAIN DOES NOT MAKE A BARN, BUT HELPS THE PARTNER”: REFLECTIONS OF AN ARCHIVER AFTER THE ROUND TABLE ON UNIVERSITY ARCHIVISTIC COOPERATION
Pedro Olassolo Benito

TURNED WITH METADATES
Ferran Abarca Peris

THE UNIVERSITY ARCHIVE OF ZARAGOZA: COOPERAR TO ADVANCE
Ana Isabel Gascón Pascual

THE HYBRID GENERATION
Rodrigo de Luz Carretero

COLLABORATIVE CLASSIFICATION: THE PROJECT OF THE WORKING GROUP TABLE OF CLASSIFICATION OF THE CONFERENCE OF ARCHIVES OF SPANISH UNIVERSITIES
Maria Dolores Moyano Gonzalez

CONNECTED: EXPERIENCES OF COOPERATION AND TRANSVERSALITY IN THE ARCHIVE OF UNIVERSITAT JAUME I
Lidon Paris Folch

AN INCIPIENT PROJECT OF COLLABORATION BETWEEN UNIVERSITY ARCHIVES: THE WORKING GROUP OF DOCUMENTARY MANAGEMENT AND ARCHIVES OF THE G9
Miquel Pastor Tous

THE DOCUMENTARY ARCHIPELAGO MANCHEGO: CONCLUSIONS OF THE ROUND TABLE “ARCHIVISTIC COOPERATION IN CIUDAD REAL”
Antonio Casado Poyales

COOPERATION IN ARCHIVES. EXPERIENCES IN THE PROVINCIAL HISTORICAL ARCHIVE OF CIUDAD REAL
Christian Madsen Visiedo

ARCHIVISTIC COOPERATION IN CIUDAD REAL FROM THE PERSPECTIVE OF A MUNICIPAL ARCHIVE: THE CASE OF TOMELLOSO
Vicente Morales Becerra

ARCHIVE OF THE DEPUTY OF CIUDAD REAL, FROM THE PAST TO THE FUTURE
Virginia de la Osa Juárez

THE ARCHIVE OF THE UNIVERSITY OF CASTILLA-LA MANCHA IS NOT AN ISLAND
Pilar Gil García

New Issue: Archive Journal

Special Issue
Archive Matters: Global Perspectives from CLIR Mellon Dissertation Fellows
Edited by Nicole Ferraiolo, R. A. Kashanipour 
August 2017
(open access)

The Medieval Temple as Material Archive: Historical Preservation and the Production of Knowledge at Mount Harṣa
Elizabeth A. Cecil

Notes of Material Importance: Archival Archaeology in the South Caucasus
Lara Fabian

Participatory Archives
Lauren Tilton, Grace Elizabeth Hale

Expurgated Books as an Archive of Practice
Hannah Marcus

Sovereignty and Silence: The Creation of a Myth of Archival Destruction, Liège, 1408
Ron Makleff

Fugitive Justice: The Possible Futures of Prison Records from US Colonial Rule in the Philippines
Benjamin D. Weber