New Issue: Archives & Records

Archives & Records, Volume 28, Issue 2, 2017
(subscription)

Articles

“Keeping time in dance archives: moving towards the phenomenological archive space”
Arike Oke

“From personal to public: field books, museums, and the opening of the archives”
Michael Jones

“Exploring encounters between families, their histories and archived oral histories”
Mary Stewart & Cynthia Brown

“Has the introduction of orphan works licensing schemes solved the problem that orphan works present to digitization projects?”
Samantha Callaghan

“Should archivists edit Wikipedia, and if so how?”
George Cooban

Opinion Pieces

“Role of public archivists in post-apartheid South Africa: passive custodians or proactive narrators”
Isabel Schellnack-Kelly

“Protecting rights, asserting professional identity”
Margaret Procter

Book Reviews

“Teaching with primary sources”
Nerys Tunnicliffe

“The later Inquisitions post mortem: mapping the medieval countryside and rural society”
Christopher Whittick

“The cartulary of Binham Priory”
Euan C. Roger

“Appraisal and acquisition strategies”
Rachel MacGregor

“Engaging with records and archives: histories and theories”
Margaret Procter

“Practical tips for developing your staff”
Caroline Sampson

“Mannock Strickland 1683–1744: agent to English convents in Flanders. Letters and accounts from exile”
Robert F. W. Smith

“Terrier of Llanthony Priory’s houses and lands in Gloucester 1443”
Marianne Wilson

“This ghastly affair: Great War letters from the Leathersellers’ archives”
Michael Page

“The letters of John Collier of Hastings, 1731–1746”
Nell Darby

“The Special Collections Handbook”
Mark Dorrington

“Participatory heritage”
Melinda Haunton

“The logbook of Thomas Slatford, headmaster Littlehampton school 1871-1911”
Philip Gale

Obituary

Michael Farrar (1929–2017)
Philip Saunders

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Call for Applications: Institute for Research Design in Librarianship 2018

We are issuing a call for applications for the Institute for Research Design in Librarianship 2018. We are seeking novice librarian researchers who are employed by academic libraries or research libraries outside an academic setting in the United States to participate in the Institute. We define “novice” broadly; if you feel that you would benefit from being guided throughout the entire research design process, we encourage your application. Librarians of all levels of professional experience are welcome to apply.

The year-long experience begins with a workshop held on the campus of Loyola Marymount University in Los Angeles, California, from June 3-9, 2018, with arrival on campus on Saturday, June 2, and departure on Sunday, June 10.
The William H. Hannon Library has received a second three-year grant from the Institute for Museum and Library Services (IMLS) to offer this continuing education opportunity (this grant, IRDL-2, is from 2016-2019). Each year 20 librarians will receive, at no cost to them, instruction in research design and a full year of peer/mentor support to complete a research project at their home institutions; the learning experience, travel to and from Los Angeles, CA, accommodations, and food will be supplied to Scholars free of charge.

We seek librarians with a passion for research and a desire to improve their research skills. IRDL is designed to bring together all that the literature tells us about the necessary conditions for librarians to conduct valid and reliable research in an institutional setting. The cohort will be chosen from a selective submission process, with an emphasis on enthusiasm for research and diversity from a variety of perspectives, including ethnicity and type and size of library.

Selection criteria:

  • Commitment to the year-long process of participating in the IRDL research community and conducting the proposed study within the 2017-2018 academic year;
  • Significance of the research problem to the operational success of libraries or to the profession of librarianship;
  • Thoughtfulness, thoroughness, and clarity of the research proposal;
  • Enthusiasm for research and a desire to learn.

We will be accepting applications from December 1, 2017 to January 27, 2018. Scholars accepted to the Institute will be notified in early March 2018. Application information may be found at http://irdlonline.org/call-for-proposals/institute-overview/.

Please contact Project Directors with any questions about the Institute or the application process:
Marie Kennedy, Serials & Electronic Resources Librarian, Loyola Marymount University (marie.kennedy@lmu.edu)
Kristine Brancolini, Dean of the Library, Loyola Marymount University (brancoli@lmu.edu)

Happy New Year!

I hope everyone had a wonderful holiday season!

As promised, I’m returning to this blog. I saw some announcements in the past few weeks that I’ll do my best to catch up on, but likely I’ll miss a few. If you know of something you believe is important to include, feel free to get in touch.

I’ll continue with announcements, and I also plan to continue posts about books and perhaps other resources about writing. There seems to be a lot of activity so I expect to provide much in the coming days.

Thanks for reading!

Taking a Break

For you regular followers, you’ve probably noticed I haven’t posted anything for a while. It’s one of those times where my professional and personal lives are both quite hectic, and this blog unfortunately is being neglected.

So I’m going to take a break until at least the new year. I want to continue this blog because I believe it’s important to share information about archival publishing, so I will come back. In the meantime, if anyone is interested in helping out for a while, please let me know. I can give you access to the blog and share what my procedures are. I welcome any contributors!

I hope everyone has a wonderful holiday season and see you in the new year!

Books About Writing: Professors as Writers: A Self-Help Guide to Productive Writing

Professors as Writers: A Self-Help Guide to Productive Writing, Robert Boice, 1990

Though this book is nearly 30 years old, much of the content is very relevant to anyone needing guidance about the writing process. Boice describes the components of how to start and continue writing.

The book is truly a self-help guide in that there are questions to help one assess personal challenges to writing, and exercises to establish productive strategies. He describes various types, such as spontaneous and generative writing. He also delves into why writers struggle: anxiety, lack of confidence, procrastination, inability to start or finish, and other psychological issues.

Boice’s manual is prescriptive, as it promotes a specific agenda to become a productive writer. Many authors, especially new or those who are required to write (e.g. for tenure) will find it helpful if they are continually challenged to make time for writing. Though mostly prescriptive, any writer can read it and glean tips that can be adapted to various writing processes.

CFP: Reference Services Review special issue Library Services for People with Disabilities

This call does not specifically mention archives, but it is a chance to share what the archival profession is doing.

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Reference Services Review is seeking authors to write on the theme of library support for people with disabilities in any type of setting, in any country.  Examples of topics include (but are not restricted to):

  • Collaborations to promote services for people with disabilities in the community, schools, campuses, assisted living centers, or other settings
  • Library collections and formats to support services for people with disabilities
  • Library outreach to people with disabilities
  • Incorporating services for people with disabilities into training or education programs conducted by librarians
  • Virtual library services for people with disabilities
  • Compliance with ADA, web accessibility, service/support animals, other standards (in library buildings or online)
  • Research or assessment of accessibility/disability issues & libraries
  • Establishing a library environment that welcomes and enables access for all
  • Advocacy efforts to promote social justice and library access for people with disabilities
  • Adaptive technology, including emerging technologies, in libraries
  • Relevant library staff training (awareness, etiquette, culture)
  • Recruiting and supporting differently-abled library staff
  • Enabling and promoting access to digital collections for people with disabilities
  • Sources and means of securing funding to support relevant collections and services in libraries
  • Literature review of existing publications dealing with library and collection accessibility for persons with disabilities

Proposals/abstracts are due by email: November 15, 2017

The theme issue, Volume 46 Issue 3, will be published in August 2018.
Manuscripts will be due by March 15.
Submitted manuscripts are evaluated using a double-blind peer review process.
Authors may expect to work on revisions during late April / early May.
Final manuscripts will be due May 15, 2018.

Send proposals/abstracts or inquiries to:

Anna Ercoli Schnitzer (schnitzr@umich.edu), Disability Issues and Outreach Librarian, Taubman Health Sciences Library, University of Michigan and
Theresa Arndt (arndtt@dickinson.edu), Associate Director Library Resources & Administration, Waidner-Spahr Library, Dickinson College.

Reference Services Review (RSR) is a quarterly, refereed journal dedicated to the enrichment of reference knowledge and the advancement of reference services.  RSR covers all aspects of reference functions, including automation of reference services, evaluation and assessment of reference functions and sources, models for delivering quality reference services in all types and sizes of libraries, development and management of teaching/learning activities, promotion of information literacy programs, and partnerships with other entities to achieve reference goals and objectives.

RSR prepares its readers to understand and embrace current and emerging technologies affecting reference functions, instructional services and information needs of library users. RSR also contains important literature guides on cultural, social, economic, political, and environmental issues, especially those which reflect a global, international perspective.  More details about the journal, including author guidelines are at:  http://www.emeraldinsight.com/rsr.htm

Call for Book Chapters: Social Justice and Activism in Libraries, Moving Beyond Diversity to Action

Book Publisher: McFarland

Su Epstein, Ph.D., co-editor. Director, Saxton B. Little Free Library, Columbia, Connecticut
Carol Smallwood, co-editor. Public Library Systems, Special, School Librarian, Michigan
Vera Gubnitskaia, co-editor. Reference Librarian, Valencia College, Winter Park, Florida

One or two chapters sought from U.S. practicing academic, public, school, special librarians, LIS faculty, sharing how to take the concept of diversity to the next level. The role librarians can play in social justice and social change, activities supporting tolerance in libraries. Topics could be inclusivity, tolerance, civic engagement, civic education, human rights, social responsibility; in the areas of collection development, programming, professional development, partnerships and outreach—just to name a few.

One author or two or three authors per chapter. Compensation: one complimentary copy per 3,000-4,000 word chapter accepted no matter how many co-authors or if one or two chapters: author discount on more copies. Contributors are expected to sign a release form in order to be published. Public, school and special librarians, LIS instructors are especially encouraged to submit.

Please e-mail titles of proposed chapters each described in a few sentences by November 30, 2017, brief bio on each author; place TOL, LAST NAME on subject line to: epsteinsc@gmail.com