Call for Survey Participants

***Seeking ArchivesSpace Users***

Hello,

My colleagues at the University of Minnesota and I are working on a series of articles for publication about our experience implementing ArchivesSpace. As such, we’d like to compare our experience with other ArchivesSpace community members via a web-based survey.

Survey Details:
– The survey should take approximately 15-20 minutes to complete depending on length of any long-form answers.
– You may start, stop, and return to the survey at any time that the survey is open.
– All responses will be anonymized for research purposes and the dataset will be made available on request for future studies.
– No questions are required and we ask that you complete the sections that are applicable to your specific institution.
– Please try to limit responses to one respondent per institution.

If you’d like to participate in this survey, please go to:  https://umn.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_4NiTHB6ZYJDSlaR

If you have any questions about the survey or subsequent research, please contact Amanda Wick at abwick@umn.edu.

Best,

Amanda Wick, Archivist
Special Collections and Rare Books
Charles Babbage Institute (Interim)
University of Minnesota Libraries
222 – 21st Avenue South
Minneapolis, MN 55455

Tel: 612-625-4867
Email: abwick@umn.edu

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CFP: “E-Resource Round Up” column – Journal of Electronic Resources Librarianship

This call does not specify archives, but as there are many electronic resources of archival collections and primary sources, this is an opportunity for archival outreach.

___________________

This is a call for contributions to the “E-Resource Round Up” column for volume 30, issue 1 of the Journal of Electronic Resources Librarianship (JERL). Submissions can be related to any aspect of electronic resources and their use in libraries, including conference reports, professional discussion groups, meetings, and practices in using electronic resources in-house. This would be a great opportunity for you to report on topics that may benefit others in our profession.

The editors would like to receive contributions to the column by Friday, November 17, 2017. Contributions should not be published elsewhere.

If you have a submission or questions, please contact the column editors: Bob Wolverton, Mississippi State University Libraries, (662) 325-0548 bwolverton@library.msstate.edu
Karen Davidson, Mississippi State University Libraries,(662) 325-3018,kdavidson@library.msstate.edu

American Historical Association Announces 2017 Prize Winners

The American Historical Association is pleased to announce the winners of its 2017 prizes. The AHA offers annual prizes honoring exceptional books, distinguished teaching and mentoring in the classroom, public history, and other historical projects. Since 1896, the Association has conferred over a thousand awards. This year’s finalists were selected from a field of over 1,300 entries by nearly 100 dedicated prize committee members. The names, publications, and projects of those who received these awards are a catalog of the best work produced in the historical discipline.

The William and Edwyna Gilbert Award for the best article in a journal, magazine, or other serial on teaching history

Laura K. Muñoz (Texas A&M Univ.-Corpus Christi) for “Civil Rights, Educational Inequality, and Transnational Takes on the US History Survey,” History of Education Quarterly 56, no. 1 (February 2016)

The J. Franklin Jameson Award for the editing of historical primary sources

The late Karsten Friis-Jensen, ed., and Peter Fisher, trans., for Saxo Grammaticus: Gesta Danorum: The History of the Danes, 2 vols. (Oxford Univ. Press, 2015)

See full list of awards.

New Issue: Information & Culture

Current Issue: Volume 52, Number 3 (Aug/Sept 2017)
(abstracts available, full issue through Project Muse)

Computing and the Environment: Introducing a Special Issue of Information & Culture
Nathan Ensmenger and Rebecca Slayton

“From Clean Rooms to Dirty Water: Labor, Semiconductor Firms, and the Struggle over Pollution and Workplace Hazards in Silicon Valley”
Christophe Lécuyer

“Data, Power, and Conservation: The Early Turn to Information Technologies to Manage Energy Resources”
Julie Cohn

“‘Governmentalities’ of Conservation Science at the Advent of Drones: Situating an Emerging Technology”
Lisa Avron

 

New/Recent Scholarship: Articles

Standards for Archives” Bulletin of the Association for Information Science and Technology Volume 43, Issue 2, December/January 2017
Morag Boyd

A Community-Driven Metadata Framework for Describing Cultural Resources: The Digital Library North Project” Cataloging and Classification Quarterly, Volume 55, 2017
Sharon Farnel ORCID Icon, Ali Shiri, Sandra Campbell, Cathy Cockney, Dinesh Rathi & Robyn Stobbs

Preservation practices of new media artists: Challenges, strategies, and attitudes in the personal management of artworks” Journal of Documentation, Volume 73 Issue 4, 2017
Colin Post

Value Co-Creation in Archival Resources: Exploring the Feature of National Archives of Bangladesh (NAB)’s Open Access Project” International Journal of Library and Information Services (IJLIS) 6(2)
Md. Mukhlesur Rahman (Japan Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (JAIST), Nomi, Japan), Toufiq Ahmed (Japan Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (JAIST), Nomi, Japan) and Kunio Shirahada (Japan Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (JAIST), Nomi, Japan

Development of Digital Libraries in India: a Survey of Digital Collection of National Digital Library of India” International Research: Journal of Library and Information Science 7 No. 2 (June 2017)
Mohd Iqbal Bhat

Among Drowned Lives: Digital Archives and Migrant Memories in the Age of Transmediality” Auto/Biography Studies 32 No. 3, Special Issue: Excavating Lives (2017)
Alice Cati & Maria Francesca Piredda

Researching Researchers: Meeting Changing Researcher Needs in a Special Collections Environment” New Review of Academic Librarianship Vol. 23 , Iss. 2-3,2017
Francesca Baseby

The Building Blocks of History” Greater Faculties: A Review of Teaching
and Learning
Nicole Martin

Introduction: The Politics of Archives,” Seminar: A Journal of Germanic Studies Vol. 53 no. 3
Bettina Brandt and Valentina Glajar

Radicalizing the Digital Humanities: Reimagining Environmental Justice Research and Teaching” Radical Teacher: A Socialist, Feminist, and Anti-Racist Journal on the Theory and Practice of Teaching Vol. 109
Stevie Ruiz, Maira Areguin, Eduardo Estrada, Jesus Jimenez, Diane Lopez, Karla Sanchez, Janet Valenzuela

Aboriginal voices in government records 1838-1968” Agora Vol. 52 no. 3
Georgia Harris

Social activism in the United States: Digital collection and primary sources,” College & Research Library News Vol. 78 no. 8
Jennifer Kaari

When Archives and Libraries Collaborate: One Institution Benefiting Another,” South Carolina Libraries, Vol. 3 no. 1
Shannon Smith

A Baseline Search Engine for Personal Life Archives
Liting Zhou, Duc-Tien Dang-Nguyen, Cathal Gurrin

Did it count?: Preservice teachers’ reflections on teaching with primary sourcesSocial Studies Research and Practice
Deborah Lynn Morowski and Theresa M. McCormick

Global Digital Culture| Poor Images, Ad Hoc Archives, Artists’ Rights: The Scrappy Beauties of Handmade Digital Culture” International Journal of Communication Vol. 11
Laura U. Marks

Running With the Ball? Making a Play for Sport Heritage Archives in Higher Education Contexts” International Journal of Heritage Studies
Geoff Kohe

Call for Chapters: Comics and Critical Librarianship for Academic Libraries (Library Juice Press)

Call for Chapter Proposals

Working Title: Comics and Critical Librarianship for Academic Libraries
Editors: Olivia Miller & Stephanie Grimm
Submission Deadline: December 15, 2017
Publisher: Library Juice Press

Book description

This book will be a collection of chapters on ways comics have been used in the practice of critical librarianship. The intended audiences for this book are librarians and library workers that currently or hope to work with comics in academic libraries, people interested in critical librarianship, and comics scholars. The purpose of this book is to add to the conversation of critical librarianship within academic libraries by highlighting the use and focus of an already radical medium (comics) by librarians and library workers who practice critical librarianship.

For the purposes of this book, we use the term “comics” to mean any work in the medium of comics/sequential art. This can mean comic book issues, graphic novels, comic strips, webcomics, minicomics, etc.

We want both critical librarianship and comics to be approachable and accessible topics to our readers. One way we aim to do this is through approachable language much in the way that Maria T. Accardi did in Feminist Pedagogy for Library Instruction.

Possible topics

Possible topic areas include but are not limited to the following:

  • Critical considerations of:
    • comics in academic library exhibitions or programming
    • comics in library instruction in higher education contexts
    • cataloging practices in relation to comics
    • acquisition or collection management/organization practices for comics and comics collections
    • comics or comics ephemera in special collections, archives, or manuscript collections
  • Case studies on the critical use of comics in academic libraries and special collections
  • Theoretical or research-based considerations of comics as a tool and site for critical librarianship
  • Other relevant considerations of the topic

Timeline

  • Abstract submission deadline: December 15, 2017
  • Notification/Feedback regarding submission: January 31, 2018
  • First drafts due: June 15, 2018
  • Final drafts due: October 15, 2018
  • Final manuscript due to publisher: December 2018

Submissions

Please email abstracts of up to 500 words to critlibcomics (at) gmail (dot) com.

Abstracts should briefly describe your topic and how your chapter discusses using comics in critical librarianship. You are welcome to submit multiple abstracts about different possible topics. If your submission is tentatively accepted, the editors may request modifications. Material cannot be previously published.

Final chapters will be in the 2000-5000-word range. Abstracts that discuss comics being used in critical librarianship practices in tribal college libraries, HBCUs, Hispanic-serving institutions, community colleges, archives, special libraries, and libraries outside the United States are especially welcome.

Please direct any questions to Olivia Miller and Stephanie Grimm, editors, at critlibcomics (at) gmail (dot) com.

About the Editors

Olivia Miller (she/her) is the Arts & Humanities Librarian at the University of Massachusetts Dartmouth. Her BA is in Art History and English from the University of North Carolina Greensboro and she attended the University of North Carolina Chapel Hill for her MSLS. She built a strong graphic novel collection in her last position at Greensboro College and taught a for-credit course for two semesters on how to read and find comics with a feminist pedagogy.

Stephanie Grimm (she/her) is the Art and Art History Librarian at George Mason University in Fairfax, VA. She holds a BFA in Illustration and earned her MSI from the University of Michigan, where she developed a dedicated minicomics collection within the university libraries. She has worked with comics and illustration students at both art & design schools and research universities, and is a proponent of critical librarianship and literacy for artists and design students.

New Issue: Records Management Journal

Records Management Journal Volume 27 Issue 3

Visualizing information in the records and archives management (RAM) disciplines
Pauline Joseph and Jenna Hartel

Records management and procurement performance
Juliet Namukasa

The woes of Swedish private archival institutions
Proscovia Svärd

Personal health records: a new type of electronic medical record
Kisha Hortman Hawthorne and Lorraine Richards

Asset management the track towards quality documentation
Jacqueline Edana Tyler

Freedom of access to government information in Africa: trends, status and challenges
Brendan Eze Asogwa and Ifeanyi Jonas Ezema