Category Archives: Call for Papers

Call for chapter proposals: Deaccessioning in Special Collections and Archives

Archivists and archival institutions are now deaccessioning more than ever before. As deaccessioning has become increasingly accepted as a useful collections management tool, some still perceive it as an ethical dilemma fraught with a high risk of controversy or angering donors and researchers alike. In archives deaccessioning, archivists grapple with ethical concerns, donor relations, appraisal questions, and disposition options. Deaccessioning in Special Collections and Archives, edited by Laura Uglean Jackson and published by Rowman & Littlefield, is the first book dedicated entirely to the topic of deaccessioning in special collections and archives. It will bring together case studies, perspectives, and in-depth discussions focused solely on topics and issues related to deaccessioning in all types of archival repositories.

Contributions from authors with experience in or knowledge of special collections and archives deaccessioning are welcome. I hope to include chapters on the following topics:

  • Case studies from various institution types (e.g. small repositories, lone arrangers, community archives)
  • Perspectives and opinion pieces about reappraisal and deaccessioning
  • Reappraisal and deaccessioning outside of the United States (particularly United Kingdom, Ireland, Australia, New Zealand)
  • Consequences of deaccessioning, including benefits and negative effects
  • Working with donors and donor relations
  • Sale of materials and use of proceeds
  • Deaccessioning compared to weeding
  • Ethical dilemmas of deaccessioning
  • Transparency/publicizing of deaccessioning, including collections and process
  • Reappraisal and deaccessioning of digital materials
  • Standards related to reappraisal and deaccessioning
  • Reappraisal challenges
  • Disposition of deaccessioned materials including transfer, return to donor, and destruction

If you have an idea for a chapter not listed, please contact me to discuss. Proposals of no more than 500 words should be submitted to me by February 12, 2018. Please include a biographical statement. Decisions regarding the submissions will be made by early March. First drafts will be due in May with an expected completion date in November 2018. Proposals and questions can be sent to: laura.ugleanjackson@unco.edu.

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Call for Chapter: Male Sex Work & Society

(reposted from the SAA Diverse Sexuality and Gender Discussion List)

Archival Research & Male Sex Work

Harrington Park Press is seeking a potential commissioned chapter author who might be interested in archival research in male sex work histories, culture, and lives.

This is for an upcoming Volume 2 companion volume to the 2014 work, Male Sex Work & Society.

Interested persons may send their CV and letter of interest to: <bcohen@harringtonparkpress>

William Cohen
Publisher & Editor-in-Chief
Harrington Park Press, LLC
New York NY

Call for Proposals: Academic Library Impact Research Grants

This is limited to ACRL members.

Call for Proposals 2018

In 2018 the Association of College and Research Libraries (ACRL) has allocated $20,000 to offer grants of up to $3,000 each for librarians to carry out new research in areas suggested by ACRL’s 2017 report Academic Library Impact: Improving Practice and Essential Areas to Research (prepared for ACRL by OCLC Research and available for download or purchase). This program is one of several developed by ACRL’s Value of Academic Libraries (VAL) Committee to support librarians in their efforts to demonstrate the impact of their work to a wider audience.

ACRL invites applications from librarians and information professionals seeking to conduct research that will demonstrate library contributions to student learning and success. The proposed project should aim to build on the foundations of the Academic Library Impact report and fill gaps in existing literature. The committee invites applicants to propose using any investigative methods appropriate to their research questions. These include but are not limited to standard quantitative and qualitative approaches, as well as critical evaluations, case studies, reflective essays, and (auto)ethnography. Proposals that involve collaboration between librarians and other higher education stakeholders, such as institutional researchers, faculty, administration, students, or community partners are also welcome.

Applications are due by 5pm Central Time on April 1, 2018. All applicants will be notified of their status by Friday, May 31, 2018. Grants funds will be disbursed within one month following completion of an agreement form.

It is anticipated that future calls for proposals will be issued in the coming years.

Eligibility

Each applicant must be a member of ACRL and employed as a librarian or information professional in a university, college, community college, or research library at the time of application for the grant.

Grants should not be sought for tuition or other degree-related expenses.

Application Instructions

The application coversheet is available to download here. Please fill it out, save it, and combine it into a single PDF with the other documents detailed below.

The application should be submitted by the principal investigator or project lead. It should include:

1) A completed cover sheet (use application form provided) with your name, contact information, ACRL membership information, and, if applicable, names and contact details of collaborators.

2) Your CV or résumé.

3) A brief abstract of the project (maximum 200 words).

4) Proposed budgetusing the worksheet provided (download .docx file). The budget should total no more than $3,000, unless additional funding has been secured. The budget should itemize costs related to carrying out the proposed research. Possible budget items include: wages for personnel, travel for work on the project, research tools and materials, technology services, and dissemination costs.

a. Indicate whether you have applied for or received any other funding for this project. No additional financial commitments by the institution are required, but they will be weighed in the evaluation of the proposal.
b. Institutional overhead is not an acceptable budget item, nor should it be listed as institutional support.
c. Any costs related to dissemination that are part of the budget should comprise no more than 20% of the total.

5) A project proposal (maximum 1000 words), following the guidelines outlined below.

Proposal Requirements

The proposal should include:

1) Statement of the research objectives and question(s): These should align with at least one of the six priority areas identified in the Academic Library Impact report. Critical perspectives will also be considered.

2) Methodology and analysis strategy for answering the question(s): Identify the methods that will be used, why they are appropriate for addressing the research question(s), and how the results will be assessed.

a. Explain any ethical considerations including how you will protect the rights of participants in your research, if applicable. If your research may be subject to an IRB, address that process here.

3) Planned research activities: This section should contain a detailed description of how the research project will be organized and implemented, including a timeline of activities. These activities should relate to the stated budget. It is expected that the project should be completed within 12 months, though dissemination of results may take longer.

a. If the proposed research constitutes a piece of a larger project, please address how the work funded by this grant fits in and what results will be achieved within the time allotted.
b. For collaborative projects, state how each team member will contribute. Team members may come from different institutions.

4) Expected outcomes and plans for dissemination: This section should describe plans for sharing the results of the project. Grant recipients are required to disseminate their research outputs in a form of their choosing. We strongly encourage that the chosen avenue of dissemination be open access and that it reach a wide audience of stakeholders within higher education.

a. Possibilities include: a conference presentation, a peer-reviewed article, a book or book chapter, a webinar, or a digital project.
b. The ACRL VAL committee will be assembling a special issue of College & Research Libraries and facilitating special sessions at the ACRL 2019 conference for grant recipients. They will invite all interested recipients to submit to those two venues. ACRL also has other avenues for publication that we would be happy to discuss.
c. In any publication or presentation of results, the grantee should acknowledge that support for the project came from ACRL.

5) Benefit of this research: Articulate the significance of this research project in advancing the role of academic libraries within your institution and the wider higher education landscape.

Application Submission

The deadline for receipt of completed applications is 5 p.m. Central Time on April 1, 2018.

Electronic submissions are required. Email a single PDF file of all required documents to Sara Goek, sgoek@ala.org.

Applicants will receive notice of the status of their research grant applications by May 31, 2018 and funds will be disbursed to recipients’ institutions within one month following completion of an agreement form.

Criteria

A subcommittee of members from the VAL Committee will review proposals. In selecting recipients, they will have the following criteria in mind and will seek balance across research questions and institutions.

  • Need for support: Is this monetary support necessary for this research to be undertaken? Is the proposed research original enough to justify funding?
  • Need for research: Will this research help fill an existing gap in the literature? Does it investigate or provide new ways of thinking about the impact of academic libraries? Are the ideas well-conceived, developed, and articulated?
  • Project design: Is the proposed project clear and intriguing? Will the proposed methodology enable effective research? Is it feasible within the proposed timeframe and budget? Are the proposed outcomes realistic?
  • Alignment with objectives: How well does the proposed project align with the priority areas suggested in the Academic Library Impact Report? Or, if this research takes a critical perspective, does the proposal explain how it will further debate in the field and deepen our understanding? How well does it align with the Value of Academic Library goals and objectives as stated in ACRL’s strategic plan?

Obligations

Researchers should expect to provide evidence of the progress and outcomes of their work. Grant recipients must:

  1. Complete and sign an agreement form for funds to be disbursed.
  2. Report on the progress of their research six months into the project.
  3. Disseminate their results within one year of completion.
  4. Provide ACRL with a summary of the research results that may be disseminated online, for example as part of a blog post or other update to the community.
  5. Acknowledge ACRL’s support in any publication or presentation resulting from this research.

Further Information

Resources on designing and conducting research are available on ALA’s LARKS webpage.

See the application frequently asked questions for more details on this program.

If your questions are not answered on the website, please contact ACRL Program Manager and Mellon/ACLS Public Fellow Sara Goek at: sgoek@ala.org or 312-280-5841.

CFP: Women & Collections, A Focus Issue of the journal Collections: A Journal for Museum and Archives Professionals

Published by Rowman & LittlefieldGuest Editors: Consuelo Sendino, Natural History Museum, London, Janet Ashton, British Library, and Margot Note, Independent Consultant

Women have not been only inspiration for the cultural world, but been also active as collectors or researchers in collections. They have left their mark in science, natural history and art. Important contributions to cite chronologically are those of Catherine the Great of Russia (1762-1796, art collector), Frances Mary Richardson Currer (1785-1861, book collector), Mary Anning (1799 – 1847, fossil collector) and Gertrude Bell (1868-1926, archaeologist who helped with the establishment of the National Museum of Iraq with one of the best collections of Mesopotamian antiquities).

Although the role of women has been important in collections, it has not been so popular as with males. This issue will display different roles in which women have been active in collections such as active collectors, known by their input in collections or for inspiration.

Articles might be focused on any role played by women regarding collections:

  • Women as collectors
  • Women as collection researchers
  • Women as inspirational point of view
  • Women as collection subject

For this issue, we are seeking articles and case studies of 15-25 pages, reviews, technical columns, and observations. See https://rowman.com/Page/Journals for more information about the journal. For more information, contact the journal editor, Juilee Decker, jdgsh@rit.edu.

Published by Rowman & Littlefield, Collections is a multi-disciplinary journal addressing all aspects of handling, preserving, researching, interpreting, and organizing collections. Established in 2004, the journal is an international, peer-reviewed publication that seeks timely exploration of the issues, practices, and policies related to collections. Scholars, archivists, curators, librarians, collections managers, preparators, registrars, educators, emerging professionals, and others are encouraged to submit their work for this focus issue.

Authors should express their interest by submitting a 150-word abstract to the journal editor by February 15, 2018. The deadline for submission of final papers is April 1, 2018. Publication is anticipated for volume 14 or 15 with an issue date of 2018 or 2019.

Call for Book Chapters: Social Justice and Activism in Libraries, Moving Beyond Diversity to Action

Book Publisher: McFarland

Su Epstein, Ph.D., co-editor. Director, Saxton B. Little Free Library, Columbia, Connecticut
Carol Smallwood, co-editor. Public Library Systems, Special, School Librarian, Michigan
Vera Gubnitskaia, co-editor. Reference Librarian, Valencia College, Winter Park, Florida

One or two chapters sought from U.S. practicing academic, public, school, special librarians, LIS faculty, sharing how to take the concept of diversity to the next level. The role librarians can play in social justice and social change, activities supporting tolerance in libraries. Topics could be inclusivity, tolerance, civic engagement, civic education, human rights, social responsibility; in the areas of collection development, programming, professional development, partnerships and outreach—just to name a few.

One author or two or three authors per chapter. Compensation: one complimentary copy per 3,000-4,000 word chapter accepted no matter how many co-authors or if one or two chapters: author discount on more copies. Contributors are expected to sign a release form in order to be published. Public, school and special librarians, LIS instructors are especially encouraged to submit.

Please e-mail titles of proposed chapters each described in a few sentences by November 30, 2017, brief bio on each author; place TOL, LAST NAME on subject line to: epsteinsc@gmail.com

CFP: VIEW Journal on “Using Television’s Material Heritage”

The medium of television is responsible for a huge accumulation of redundant objects: old TV sets and VTRs (and the tables to put them on), superseded production equipment and software, videotape and film that is no longer useable. This raises various questions, from practical to historiographical and methodological ones.

What are we to do with this accumulation of objects, many of which are not easily recycled?  How do we approach these objects as historical records? What tools and research practices do we need to go beyond the written cultures of television and address its non-discursive experiences? How do we articulate historical narratives that may emerge out of television’s non-discursive past? What histories do these objects tell, other than what’s already been documented and preserved in written and audiovisual archives?

It is not enough simply to document these objects. They are the silent witnesses to television’s history, and so can be made to speak again. This issue of VIEW will explore the many attempts that are taking place to preserve, reuse, engage with and study the objects from television’s material heritage. There are many issues involved here:

  • museum practice in an age of shrinking budgets;
  • the status of enthusiasts and their collections;
  • the hidden ecological impact of TV industries;
  • the ways that ‘redundant’ production equipment can often be used effectively well after its ‘use-by’ date by those with access to few resources;
  • television objects as historical records;
  • historiographical challenges posed by doing history with objects;
  • different approaches to studying and writing about television objects;
  • hands-on television research

VIEW’s online platform allows authors to engage with different ways of narrativising television’s past through the use of video and sound recordings as well as written accounts. Contributors are especially encouraged to experiment and engage with multi-media presentations of histories from objects and hands-on television research.

Practical

Contributions are encouraged from authors with different kinds of expertise and interests in media studies, television and media history.

Paper proposals (max. 500 words) are due on January 15, 2018. Submissions should be sent to the managing editor of the journal, Dana Mustata. A notice of acceptance will be sent to authors by mid-February 2018.

Articles (3 – 6,000 words) will be due on May 15, 2018. Longer articles are welcome, given that they comply with the journal’s author guidelines.

About VIEW Journal

See www.viewjournal.eu for the current and back issues. VIEW is supported by the EUscreen Network and published by the Netherlands Institute for Sound and Vision in collaboration with Utrecht University, Royal Holloway University of London, and University of Luxembourg. VIEW is proud to be an open access journal. All articles are indexed through the Directory of Open Access Journals, the EBSCO Film and Television Index, Paperity and NARCIS.

Contact Info:

For further information or questions about the issue, please contact its co-editors John Ellis and Dana Mustata.

Contact Email: support@viewjournal.eu
URL: http://viewjournal.eu/callforpapers

CFP: “E-Resource Round Up” column – Journal of Electronic Resources Librarianship

This call does not specify archives, but as there are many electronic resources of archival collections and primary sources, this is an opportunity for archival outreach.

___________________

This is a call for contributions to the “E-Resource Round Up” column for volume 30, issue 1 of the Journal of Electronic Resources Librarianship (JERL). Submissions can be related to any aspect of electronic resources and their use in libraries, including conference reports, professional discussion groups, meetings, and practices in using electronic resources in-house. This would be a great opportunity for you to report on topics that may benefit others in our profession.

The editors would like to receive contributions to the column by Friday, November 17, 2017. Contributions should not be published elsewhere.

If you have a submission or questions, please contact the column editors: Bob Wolverton, Mississippi State University Libraries, (662) 325-0548 bwolverton@library.msstate.edu
Karen Davidson, Mississippi State University Libraries,(662) 325-3018,kdavidson@library.msstate.edu