Category Archives: Call for Papers

Call for Book Chapters: Social Justice and Activism in Libraries, Moving Beyond Diversity to Action

Book Publisher: McFarland

Su Epstein, Ph.D., co-editor. Director, Saxton B. Little Free Library, Columbia, Connecticut
Carol Smallwood, co-editor. Public Library Systems, Special, School Librarian, Michigan
Vera Gubnitskaia, co-editor. Reference Librarian, Valencia College, Winter Park, Florida

One or two chapters sought from U.S. practicing academic, public, school, special librarians, LIS faculty, sharing how to take the concept of diversity to the next level. The role librarians can play in social justice and social change, activities supporting tolerance in libraries. Topics could be inclusivity, tolerance, civic engagement, civic education, human rights, social responsibility; in the areas of collection development, programming, professional development, partnerships and outreach—just to name a few.

One author or two or three authors per chapter. Compensation: one complimentary copy per 3,000-4,000 word chapter accepted no matter how many co-authors or if one or two chapters: author discount on more copies. Contributors are expected to sign a release form in order to be published. Public, school and special librarians, LIS instructors are especially encouraged to submit.

Please e-mail titles of proposed chapters each described in a few sentences by November 30, 2017, brief bio on each author; place TOL, LAST NAME on subject line to: epsteinsc@gmail.com

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CFP: VIEW Journal on “Using Television’s Material Heritage”

The medium of television is responsible for a huge accumulation of redundant objects: old TV sets and VTRs (and the tables to put them on), superseded production equipment and software, videotape and film that is no longer useable. This raises various questions, from practical to historiographical and methodological ones.

What are we to do with this accumulation of objects, many of which are not easily recycled?  How do we approach these objects as historical records? What tools and research practices do we need to go beyond the written cultures of television and address its non-discursive experiences? How do we articulate historical narratives that may emerge out of television’s non-discursive past? What histories do these objects tell, other than what’s already been documented and preserved in written and audiovisual archives?

It is not enough simply to document these objects. They are the silent witnesses to television’s history, and so can be made to speak again. This issue of VIEW will explore the many attempts that are taking place to preserve, reuse, engage with and study the objects from television’s material heritage. There are many issues involved here:

  • museum practice in an age of shrinking budgets;
  • the status of enthusiasts and their collections;
  • the hidden ecological impact of TV industries;
  • the ways that ‘redundant’ production equipment can often be used effectively well after its ‘use-by’ date by those with access to few resources;
  • television objects as historical records;
  • historiographical challenges posed by doing history with objects;
  • different approaches to studying and writing about television objects;
  • hands-on television research

VIEW’s online platform allows authors to engage with different ways of narrativising television’s past through the use of video and sound recordings as well as written accounts. Contributors are especially encouraged to experiment and engage with multi-media presentations of histories from objects and hands-on television research.

Practical

Contributions are encouraged from authors with different kinds of expertise and interests in media studies, television and media history.

Paper proposals (max. 500 words) are due on January 15, 2018. Submissions should be sent to the managing editor of the journal, Dana Mustata. A notice of acceptance will be sent to authors by mid-February 2018.

Articles (3 – 6,000 words) will be due on May 15, 2018. Longer articles are welcome, given that they comply with the journal’s author guidelines.

About VIEW Journal

See www.viewjournal.eu for the current and back issues. VIEW is supported by the EUscreen Network and published by the Netherlands Institute for Sound and Vision in collaboration with Utrecht University, Royal Holloway University of London, and University of Luxembourg. VIEW is proud to be an open access journal. All articles are indexed through the Directory of Open Access Journals, the EBSCO Film and Television Index, Paperity and NARCIS.

Contact Info:

For further information or questions about the issue, please contact its co-editors John Ellis and Dana Mustata.

Contact Email: support@viewjournal.eu
URL: http://viewjournal.eu/callforpapers

CFP: “E-Resource Round Up” column – Journal of Electronic Resources Librarianship

This call does not specify archives, but as there are many electronic resources of archival collections and primary sources, this is an opportunity for archival outreach.

___________________

This is a call for contributions to the “E-Resource Round Up” column for volume 30, issue 1 of the Journal of Electronic Resources Librarianship (JERL). Submissions can be related to any aspect of electronic resources and their use in libraries, including conference reports, professional discussion groups, meetings, and practices in using electronic resources in-house. This would be a great opportunity for you to report on topics that may benefit others in our profession.

The editors would like to receive contributions to the column by Friday, November 17, 2017. Contributions should not be published elsewhere.

If you have a submission or questions, please contact the column editors: Bob Wolverton, Mississippi State University Libraries, (662) 325-0548 bwolverton@library.msstate.edu
Karen Davidson, Mississippi State University Libraries,(662) 325-3018,kdavidson@library.msstate.edu

Call for Chapters: Comics and Critical Librarianship for Academic Libraries (Library Juice Press)

Call for Chapter Proposals

Working Title: Comics and Critical Librarianship for Academic Libraries
Editors: Olivia Miller & Stephanie Grimm
Submission Deadline: December 15, 2017
Publisher: Library Juice Press

Book description

This book will be a collection of chapters on ways comics have been used in the practice of critical librarianship. The intended audiences for this book are librarians and library workers that currently or hope to work with comics in academic libraries, people interested in critical librarianship, and comics scholars. The purpose of this book is to add to the conversation of critical librarianship within academic libraries by highlighting the use and focus of an already radical medium (comics) by librarians and library workers who practice critical librarianship.

For the purposes of this book, we use the term “comics” to mean any work in the medium of comics/sequential art. This can mean comic book issues, graphic novels, comic strips, webcomics, minicomics, etc.

We want both critical librarianship and comics to be approachable and accessible topics to our readers. One way we aim to do this is through approachable language much in the way that Maria T. Accardi did in Feminist Pedagogy for Library Instruction.

Possible topics

Possible topic areas include but are not limited to the following:

  • Critical considerations of:
    • comics in academic library exhibitions or programming
    • comics in library instruction in higher education contexts
    • cataloging practices in relation to comics
    • acquisition or collection management/organization practices for comics and comics collections
    • comics or comics ephemera in special collections, archives, or manuscript collections
  • Case studies on the critical use of comics in academic libraries and special collections
  • Theoretical or research-based considerations of comics as a tool and site for critical librarianship
  • Other relevant considerations of the topic

Timeline

  • Abstract submission deadline: December 15, 2017
  • Notification/Feedback regarding submission: January 31, 2018
  • First drafts due: June 15, 2018
  • Final drafts due: October 15, 2018
  • Final manuscript due to publisher: December 2018

Submissions

Please email abstracts of up to 500 words to critlibcomics (at) gmail (dot) com.

Abstracts should briefly describe your topic and how your chapter discusses using comics in critical librarianship. You are welcome to submit multiple abstracts about different possible topics. If your submission is tentatively accepted, the editors may request modifications. Material cannot be previously published.

Final chapters will be in the 2000-5000-word range. Abstracts that discuss comics being used in critical librarianship practices in tribal college libraries, HBCUs, Hispanic-serving institutions, community colleges, archives, special libraries, and libraries outside the United States are especially welcome.

Please direct any questions to Olivia Miller and Stephanie Grimm, editors, at critlibcomics (at) gmail (dot) com.

About the Editors

Olivia Miller (she/her) is the Arts & Humanities Librarian at the University of Massachusetts Dartmouth. Her BA is in Art History and English from the University of North Carolina Greensboro and she attended the University of North Carolina Chapel Hill for her MSLS. She built a strong graphic novel collection in her last position at Greensboro College and taught a for-credit course for two semesters on how to read and find comics with a feminist pedagogy.

Stephanie Grimm (she/her) is the Art and Art History Librarian at George Mason University in Fairfax, VA. She holds a BFA in Illustration and earned her MSI from the University of Michigan, where she developed a dedicated minicomics collection within the university libraries. She has worked with comics and illustration students at both art & design schools and research universities, and is a proponent of critical librarianship and literacy for artists and design students.

Call for Applications: Evidence Summaries Team of Evidence Based Library and Information Practice

Call for Applications:  Evidence Based Library and Information Practice Evidence Summaries Writers

EBLIP seeks to add five writers to the Evidence Summaries Team. Evidence Summaries provide critical appraisal syntheses for specific research articles. These research synopses provide readers with information regarding the original research article’s validity and reliability, thus providing information on the presence or absence of evidence with which to make informed decisions. Evidence Summaries Team members are required to write two evidence summaries per year, with a two year commitment to the journal. Evidence Summaries cover all areas of library and information studies and we encourage applications from information professionals in areas such as school, public, and special libraries, as well as academic settings.

Interested persons should send a statement of interest, indicating areas of strength they would bring to the role, as well as a brief résumé to Heather Pretty (Associate Editor, Evidence Summaries) hjpretty@mun.ca by October 15, 2017. Applicants who are shortlisted will be asked to submit a sample evidence summary.

**Please note that Evidence Based Library and Information Practice is a non-profit, open access journal and all positions are voluntary and unpaid. The positions are an excellent opportunity for continuing professional development and gaining experience in reviewing or critically appraising library-related research.

**Only those applicants who are selected or shortlisted will be contacted by the Editors.
About the journal: Published quarterly by the University of Alberta, this peer reviewed, open access journal is targeted at all library and information professionals interested in an evidence based model of practice. By facilitating access to library and information studies research via original research articles and evidence summaries of relevant research from the library literature, Evidence Based Library and Information Practice enables information professionals to practice their profession in an evidence-based manner.

Please visit the Evidence Based Library and Information Practice website for further information about the journal.

CFP: 2017 Best Book Proposal Contest for the Beta Phi Mu Scholars Series

This call does not specifically mention archives, but archives fits within their description.


2017 Best Book Proposal Contest for the Beta Phi Mu Scholars Series

Contest Sponsored by Rowman & Littlefield, Publishers

Please provide detailed answers to the following prompts, along with required documentation, for a chance to win $250.00 from Rowman & Littlefield and the opportunity to pursue a book contract. To be eligible, proposals must be submitted electronically to Andrea Falcone, Editor, at bpmseries@gmail.com by 11:59 p.m. on November 15th, 2017.  Submissions will be evaluated by the Beta Phi Mu Scholars Series Editorial Board.  The contest winner will be contacted in December 2017.

About the Series

Books published as part of the Scholars Series advance knowledge in the discipline and profession of library and information science. More information about the series can be found here.

Book Proposal Outline

  1. Why is this book needed?  Who will want to read it or use it and why? How is it different from other books on the same topic?
  2.  Imagine that your book is in our next catalog.  Begin with a title that captures the tone and spirit of your book.  What would the catalog description be?  Emphasize special features or sections using bullets where appropriate.
  3.  Identify titles on the same topic published in the last 5-7 years. These will be your book’s competition.  Can you give a sentence or two that would make us want to publish your book even though those other books are available? If there are not books on this topic, why is that?
  4.  Construct a 1-3 paragraph biographical statement and submit a copy of your curriculum vitae including information on your previous experience presenting, writing, teaching, conducting research, or other professional activities relevant to the proposed book. In the biographical statement, emphasize the relevance of your education and experience to this book topic.  Please include information about other articles or books you have published.
  5.  Provide a tentative table of contents that includes page number estimates for each chapter.  Please also include for each chapter an estimated number of photographs, figures, tables, or other graphic elements you think you would want to include in the chapter.
  6.  Present at least one example of your published professional writing. This can be a journal article, a poster abstract, a book chapter, or another sample publication.
  7.  What is your target date for completing the manuscript?

CFP: Practical Technology for Archives

Practical Technology for Archives is an open-access, peer-reviewed, electronic journal focused on the practical application of technology to address challenges encountered in working with archives. Our goal is to provide a timely resource, published semi-annually, that addresses issues of interest to practitioners, and to foster community interaction through monitored comments. Submissions may be full articles, brief tips and techniques, AV tutorials, reviews (tools, software, books), or post-grant technical reports. Please visit practicaltechnologyforarchives.org for more information.

The editorial board of Practical Technology for Archives is calling for proposals/abstracts for Issue no.9 (2018:Winter).

The submission timeline is as follows:

Proposals due: October 27
Selections made: November 8
1st drafts due: December 8
Draft reviews: December 22
Revisions due: January 19
Publication: February 2

Submissions should be sent to:
Practical Technology for Archives
Randall Miles
Managing Editor
rm527@cornell.edu