Call for Chapters: Creativity and Person Growth for Librarians/Social Justice and Activism in Libraries

1. Creativity for Success and Personal Growth for Librarians

Book Publisher: McFarland

Vera Gubnitskaia, co-editor, Library Partnerships with Writers and Poets (McFarland, 2017); public, academic librarian, indexer.

Carol Smallwood, co-editor, Gender Studies in the Library (McFarland, 2017);
public library administrator, special, school librarian.

One or two chapters sought from U.S. practicing academic, public, school, special librarians, LIS faculty, library administrators, and board members. Successful proposals will address creative, practical, how-to chapters and case studies depicting a variety of aspects and angles of the library profession as a creative endeavor, within the library walls and beyond. We are looking for ideas that can serve as a foundation, to incorporate into an MLIS course; a Human Resources’ or an organizational plan, as well as a kick-start to personal career goals planning. The focus is on library staff professional and personal growth and development, NOT creative programming and services for patrons.

No previously published, simultaneously submitted material. One, two, or three authors per chapter; each chapter by the same author(s). Compensation: one complimentary copy per 3,000-4,000 word chapter accepted no matter how many co-authors or if one or two chapters; author discount. Contributors are expected to sign a release form in order to be published.

Please e-mail titles of proposed chapter(s) with a concise clear summary by October 30, 2017, with brief bio on each author; place CRE, Your Name, on subject line to gubnitv11@gmail.com

2. Social Justice and Activism in Libraries, Moving Beyond Diversity to Action

Book Publisher: McFarland

Su Epstein, Ph.D., co-editor. Director, Saxton B. Little Free Library, Columbia, Connecticut
Carol Smallwood, co-editor. Public Library Systems, Special, School Librarian, Michigan
Vera Gubnitskaia, co-editor. Reference Librarian, Valencia College, Winter Park, Florida

One or two chapters sought from U.S. practicing academic, public, school, special librarians, LIS faculty, sharing how to take the concept of diversity to the next level. The role librarians can play in social justice and social change, activities supporting tolerance in libraries. Topics could be inclusivity, tolerance, civic engagement, civic education, human rights, social responsibility; in the areas of collection development, programming, professional development, partnerships and outreach—just to name a few.

One author or two or three authors per chapter. Compensation: one complimentary copy per 3,000-4,000 word chapter accepted no matter how many co-authors or if one or two chapters: author discount on more copies. Contributors are expected to sign a release form in order to be published. Public, school and special librarians, LIS instructors are especially encouraged to submit.

Please e-mail titles of proposed chapters each described in a few sentences by October 30, 2017, brief bio on each author; place TOL, LAST NAME on subject line to: epsteinsc@gmail.com

Advertisements

New/Recent Scholarship: Books

Agents of Empire: How E.L. Mitchell’s photographs shaped Australia
By Joanna Sassoon

Participatory Heritage
Edited by Henriette Roued-Cunliffe and Andrea Copeland

Presidential Libraries as Performance: Curating American Character from Herbert Hoover to George W. Bush (Theater in the Americas)
Jodi Kantor

The No-nonsense Guide to Project Management
Barbara Allan

Primary Research and Writing: People, Places, and Spaces, by Lynee Lewis Gaillet, Michelle F. Eble.

Media, Margins, and Civic Agency, by multiple authors. One chapter is “Victims at the Margins? A Comparative Analysis of the Use of Primary Sources in Reporting Personal Tragedy in Norway and the UK.”

Engaging with Records and Archives Histories and Theories, Edited by Fiorella Foscarini, Heather MacNeil, Bonnie Mak, and Gillian Oliver.

The Special Collections Handbook, 2nd Edition, by Alison Cullingford.

The History and Uncertain Future of Handwriting, by Anne Trubeck

Valuing Your Collection: A practical guide for museums, libraries and archives
Freda Matassa

Searching for Color in Black & White: Epistemic Closure, the RIT Archives, and the Colonial Roots of White Invisibility (thesis)
Andrew James

Managing People and Projects in Museums: Strategies that Work
Martha Morris

The Care and Display of Historic Clothing
Karen M. DePauw

Registration Methods for the Small Museum, Fifth Edition
Daniel B. Reibel, revised by Deborah Rose Van Horn

Call for Book Proposals: Controversial Monuments and Memorials

Controversial Monuments and Memorials:
A Guide from the American Association for State and Local History

In the wake of the horrific recent events in Charlottesville, Virginia, and the ensuing move to remove monuments to white supremacy, the American Association for State and Local History Editorial Board is seeking book proposals for a work tentatively titled Controversial Monuments and Memorials: A Guide from the American Association for State and Local History.

In order to publish the book while communities are still grappling with this part of their local history, the Board seeks proposals from authors able to complete a 40-50,000 word manuscript between now and December 29, 2017 (approximately four months). Given this short timeline, the Editorial Board will consider proposals that include some reprinted material.

The AASLH Editorial Board envisions a guide for public officials, community leaders, and historic site and museum professionals that will prepare readers to:

  1. Understand the history of racial violence that makes these monuments, memorials, and other physical markers like street signs, controversial in the United States (possibly also providing some international context and examples for comparative purposes).
  2. Discuss the events in Charlottesville and other locales as they relate to their own communities.
  3. Present their communities with practical ways to move forward in contextualizing and/or removing controversial monuments.

Proposals should address these questions:

  1. Imagine that your book is being promoted on the AASLH website or on Amazon. Begin with a title that captures the tone and spirit of your book. What would the ideal descriptive copy be? Emphasize special features or sections using bullets where appropriate.
  2. Your one to three paragraph bio. Emphasize your education and experience that’s relevant to this book topic. Please include other articles or books you’ve published related to this topic. The point here is to position yourself as an expert in this area
  3. Tentative table of contents. Please include page number estimates for each chapter. Please also include for each chapter an estimated number of photographs, figures, tables, or other graphic elements you think you would want to include in the chapter.

For questions, please contact Rebecca Shrum, Series Editor, at rshrum@iupui.edu or Bob Beatty, Managing Editor, at beatty@aaslh.org.

Rowman & Littlefield will offer a $1,000 advance against royalties to the author upon acceptance of a complete manuscript delivered by December 29, 2017.

Proposals are due Monday, September 18, to Bob Beatty (beatty@aaslh.org).

Let’s Do Lunch at ARCHIVES 2017

Dive into a lunch discussion of the professional literature with your colleagues during ARCHIVES 2017!

  • Article exploration: Get a peek at a forthcoming American Archivist article—“Surveying Archivists and their Work toward Advocacy and Management, or ‘Enterprise Archiving’” by Sarah A. Buchanan, Jane Gruning, Ayse Gursoy, and Lecia Barker—during a Brown Bag Lunch on Thursday, July 27, 12:15 p.m.–1:30 p.m. Discussion will be led by American Archivist Editor Greg Hunter. RSVP by emailing Abigail Christian at achristian@archivists.org (subject line: “American Archivist Brown Bag Lunch”). Article will be forwarded to you.
  • Book Discussion: How can archivists create a diverse record or recruit and retain a diverse workforce? Whose stories are being told—and by whom? Where are the silences in the record? These questions and more are at the heart of the 2017 One Book, One Profession selection, Through the Archival Looking Glass: A Reader on Diversity and Inclusion, edited by Mary A. Caldera and Kathryn M. Neal. Join Camila Tessler of Yale University who will lead a Brown Bag lunch discussion on this acclaimed collection of essays on Friday, July 28, from 12:45 p.m.–1:45 p.m. RSVP by emailing Abigail Christian at achristian@archivists.org (subject line: “Through the Archival Looking Glass Brown Bag Lunch”).

New Book: Women in the Museum: Lessons From the Workplace

From the authors:

Museums are complex workplaces.  Guardians of America’s patrimony, they are simultaneously thought of as traditional, boring and irrelevant, but also progressive, fun and important. With collections and exhibitions lauded and vilified, museums are both significant economic drivers and astoundingly vulnerable organizations.  Collectively United States museums employ nearly 353,000 people, almost half of them women.  There is no denying that most museums are stimulating and wondrous, one-of-a-kind, work environments, but two years ago we could not have imagined the gender inequity lying beneath their placid exteriors.
Women in the Museum explores the professional lives of the field’s female workforce, a cohort that grew exponentially from the late 19th-century to the present. It chronicles the challenges working women in the museum field face today, as well as their responses to widespread entrenched and unconscious gender bias.  In doing so, we hope it clarifies how women’s work in museums is different from men’s, and why we think museums must create, foster and protect a level playing field.
Along the way, we asked ourselves these questions:  Are workplace challenges more acute for women if a field is under-resourced, under-appreciated, or in some instances, under-utilized? How is leadership and internal decision-making different in female dominated museums?  Do public perceptions change toward fields where females make up half or more of the workforce?
It is difficult to write about women in the workplace and not write about diversity, and we have been taken to task for that.  It’s especially difficult in a field that since its founding has been a bastion of white, middle and upper-class men and subsequently women.  While issues of racial and ethnic diversity, sexual orientation, age, physical ability and class are often aligned with gender equity, we’ve chosen to take a bite out of the broadest and most basic of topics in one of the narrowest of fields — an environment almost exclusively nonprofit, under-resourced, and little understood by the public.  Our intent is to pull back the curtain on a long-standing and unresolved gender issue:  equity.  What we’ve written is an opening salvo deserving wider and deeper scrutiny.
We believe museums create communities. Those communities include women as subjects of collections, exhibits and programming, women as audience members and supporters, and as employees.  That said, we would like to suggest that for us diversity is the presumption that everyone has a place at the table. If you think those ideas are remnants of the 1970’s, read on. We believe there is still much work to do. And for us, inclusion as well as equity are what is important, and making sure women are represented is the place to start.

One Book, One Profession 2017

How can archivists create a diverse record or recruit and retain a diverse workforce? Whose stories are being told—and by whom? Where are the silences in the record? These questions and more are at the heart of the 2017 One Book, One Profession selection, Through the Archival Looking Glass: A Reader on Diversity and Inclusion, edited by Mary A. Caldera and Kathryn M. Neal.

In ten essays incorporating theory and case studies, archivists explore prominent themes related to diversity and question the archive on representation, authority, neutrality, objectivity, and power. This book illustrates a multitude of perspectives and issues so that fresh voices can emerge alongside more familiar ones, and new concepts can be examined along with new perspectives on established ideas.

Diversity is an ever-evolving concept; the term itself is increasingly rephrased as inclusion. By stimulating further ideas and conversation, we can come closer to a common understanding of what diversity and inclusion are or can be and, perhaps most importantly, how they may be realized in archives and the archival profession. As Stephen Scarth of the Public Record Office of Northern Ireland wrote in his review of the book for Archives and Records, The Journal of the Archives and Records Association: “This collection of essays should be best viewed as a springboard which will hopefully inspire further original thought on what is still an emerging subject.”

The ideas in this book don’t end with the last page. For the second year of One Book, One Profession, join your colleagues in reading, talking about, and translating these theories into action.

Let’s read Through the Archival Looking Glass—together!

Group Discount on Book Purchase: Host a book discussion within your institution, among archivists in your community, or at a regional meeting—group orders of 5 or more books receive a 40% discount!

Study Guide Questions: Click here to download.

Related Reading & Resources: Click here for a list of other resources.

Selected Events

ARCHIVES 2017 in Portland

Twitter Discussions

  • Follow #OBOP17 on twitter for more updates and to join the conversation profession-wide

SAA Book Sale thru May 8

Offer valid April 21–May 8, 2017.  While supplies last.

Books for $15 each . . .

Controlling the Past: Documenting Society and Institutions
List $56 (SAA Members $39.95)

Many Happy Returns: Advocacy and the Development of Archives
List $56 (SAA Members $39.95)

Navigating Legal Issues in Archives
List $69.95 (SAA Members $49.95)

*        *        *

Books for $10 each . . .

Archival Internships: A Guide for Faculty, Supervisors, and Students
List $29.95 (SAA Members $24.95)

Becoming a Trusted Digital Repository (Module 8)
List $29.99 (SAA Members $19.99)

Describing Archives: A Content Standard
List $29.95 (SAA Members $24.95)

College and University Archives: Readings in Theory and Practice
List $54.95 (SAA Members $39.95)

Encoded Archival Description Tag Library – Version EAD3
List $29.95 (SAA Members $24.95)

How to Keep Union Records
List $49 (SAA Members $35)

Managing Congressional Collections
List $19.95 (SAA Members $19.95)

Norton on Archives: The Writings of Margaret Cross Norton on Archival and Records Management
List $45 (SAA Members $35)

Protecting Your Collections: A Manual of Archival Security
List $30 (SAA Members $25)

Waldo Gifford Leland and the Origins of the American Archival Profession
List $62.95 (SAA Members $44.95)