Author Archives: Cheryl

Call for Nominations: Boydston Essay Prize

The Association for Documentary Editing invites nominations for the 2018 Boydston Essay Prize. The prize will be awarded to the best essay or review published between January 1, 2016 and December 31, 2017, the primary focus of which is the editing of a volume of works or documents. The award carries a cash honorarium of $300. Eligible essays may have been published in digital and print journals, monographs, and collections. Please submit nominations and citations in the body of an e-mail, and attach essays or reviews to be considered as Rich Text Format (RTF), MS Word, or PDF to the address below. Self-nominations are welcome. The prize will be awarded in June 2018 at the ADE annual meeting in Olympia, Washington.

Nominations are due by January 31, 2018.

Submit nominations to:
Tony Curtis
Assistant Editor
Civil War Governors of Kentucky Digital Documentary Edition
tony.curtis@ky.gov

Advertisements

Call for Chapter Proposals: Social Justice and Activism in Libraries, Moving Beyond Diversity to Action

Social Justice and Activism in Libraries, Moving Beyond Diversity to
Action
Book Publisher: McFarland

Su Epstein, Ph.D., co-editor. Director, Saxton B. Little Free Library,
Columbia, Connecticut
Carol Smallwood, co-editor. Public Library Systems, Special, School Librarian,
Michigan
Vera Gubnitskaia, co-editor. Reference Librarian, Valencia College, Winter
Park, Florida

One or two chapters sought from U.S. practicing academic, public, school,
special librarians, LIS faculty, sharing how to take the concept of diversity
to the next level. The role librarians can play in social justice and social
change, activities supporting tolerance in libraries. Topics could be
inclusivity, tolerance, civic engagement, civic education, human rights,
social responsibility; in the areas of collection development, programming,
professional development, partnerships and outreach—just to name a few.

One author or two or three authors per chapter. Compensation: one
complimentary copy per 3,000-5,000 word chapter accepted no matter how many
co-authors or if one or two chapters: author discount on more copies.
Contributors are expected to sign a release form in order to be published.
Public, school and special librarians, LIS instructors are especially
encouraged to submit.

Please e-mail titles of proposed chapters each described in a few sentences by
February 28, 2018, brief bio on each author; place TOL, LAST NAME on subject
line to: epsteinsc@gmail.com

Call for Chapter Proposals: Deaccessioning in Special Collections and Archives

Archivists and archival institutions are now deaccessioning more than ever before. As deaccessioning has become increasingly accepted as a useful collections management tool, some still perceive it as an ethical dilemma fraught with a high risk of controversy or angering donors and researchers alike. In archives deaccessioning, archivists grapple with ethical concerns, donor relations, appraisal questions, and disposition options. Deaccessioning in Special Collections and Archives, edited by Laura Uglean Jackson and published by Rowman & Littlefield, is the first book dedicated entirely to the topic of deaccessioning in special collections and archives. It will bring together case studies, perspectives, and in-depth discussions focused solely on topics and issues related to deaccessioning in all types of archival repositories.

Contributions from authors with experience in or knowledge of special collections and archives deaccessioning are welcome. I hope to include chapters on the following topics:

  • Case studies from various institution types (e.g. small repositories, lone arrangers, community archives)
  • Perspectives and opinion pieces about reappraisal and deaccessioning
  • Reappraisal and deaccessioning outside of the United States (particularly United Kingdom, Ireland, Australia, New Zealand)
  • Consequences of deaccessioning, including benefits and negative effects
  • Working with donors and donor relations
  • Sale of materials and use of proceeds
  • Deaccessioning compared to weeding
  • Ethical dilemmas of deaccessioning
  • Transparency/publicizing of deaccessioning, including collections and process
  • Reappraisal and deaccessioning of digital materials
  • Standards related to reappraisal and deaccessioning
  • Reappraisal challenges
  • Disposition of deaccessioned materials including transfer, return to donor, and destruction

If you have an idea for a chapter not listed, please contact me to discuss.

Proposals of no more than 500 words should be submitted to me by February 12, 2018. Please include a biographical statement. Decisions regarding the submissions will be made by early March. First drafts will be due in May with an expected completion date in November 2018. Proposals and questions can be sent to: laura.ugleanjackson@unco.edu.

——————————
Laura Uglean Jackson
Archives and Special Collections Librarian
University of Northern Colorado
laura.ugleanjackson@unco.edu

Call for Chapter Proposals: Creativity for Success and Personal Growth for Librarians

Creativity for Success and Personal Growth for Librarians
Book Publisher: McFarland

Vera Gubnitskaia, co-editor, Library Partnerships with Writers and Poets
(McFarland, 2017); public, academic librarian, indexer.

Carol Smallwood, co-editor, Gender Studies in the Library (McFarland, 2017);
public library administrator, special, school librarian.

One or two chapters sought from U.S. practicing academic, public, school,
special librarians, LIS faculty, library administrators, and board members.
Successful proposals will address creative, practical, how-to chapters and
case studies depicting a variety of aspects and angles of the library
profession as a creative endeavor, within the library walls and beyond such as
being an artist, writer, photographer, editor. Ideas needed that can serve as
a foundation, incorporate into an MLIS course; a Human Resources’ or an
organizational plan, as well kick-start personal career goals planning. The
focus is on library staff professional and personal growth and development,
NOT creative programming and services for patrons. Request a helpful tentative
Table of Contents.

No previously published, simultaneously submitted material. One, two, or three
authors per chapter; each chapter by the same author(s). Compensation: one
complimentary copy per 3,000-5,000 word chapter accepted no matter how many
co-authors or if one or two chapters; author discount. Contributors are
expected to sign a release form in order to be published.

Please e-mail titles of proposed chapter(s) with a concise clear summary by
February 28, 2018, with brief bio on each author; place CRE, Your Name, on
subject line to gubnitv11@gmail.com

Call for chapter proposals: Deaccessioning in Special Collections and Archives

Archivists and archival institutions are now deaccessioning more than ever before. As deaccessioning has become increasingly accepted as a useful collections management tool, some still perceive it as an ethical dilemma fraught with a high risk of controversy or angering donors and researchers alike. In archives deaccessioning, archivists grapple with ethical concerns, donor relations, appraisal questions, and disposition options. Deaccessioning in Special Collections and Archives, edited by Laura Uglean Jackson and published by Rowman & Littlefield, is the first book dedicated entirely to the topic of deaccessioning in special collections and archives. It will bring together case studies, perspectives, and in-depth discussions focused solely on topics and issues related to deaccessioning in all types of archival repositories.

Contributions from authors with experience in or knowledge of special collections and archives deaccessioning are welcome. I hope to include chapters on the following topics:

  • Case studies from various institution types (e.g. small repositories, lone arrangers, community archives)
  • Perspectives and opinion pieces about reappraisal and deaccessioning
  • Reappraisal and deaccessioning outside of the United States (particularly United Kingdom, Ireland, Australia, New Zealand)
  • Consequences of deaccessioning, including benefits and negative effects
  • Working with donors and donor relations
  • Sale of materials and use of proceeds
  • Deaccessioning compared to weeding
  • Ethical dilemmas of deaccessioning
  • Transparency/publicizing of deaccessioning, including collections and process
  • Reappraisal and deaccessioning of digital materials
  • Standards related to reappraisal and deaccessioning
  • Reappraisal challenges
  • Disposition of deaccessioned materials including transfer, return to donor, and destruction

If you have an idea for a chapter not listed, please contact me to discuss. Proposals of no more than 500 words should be submitted to me by February 12, 2018. Please include a biographical statement. Decisions regarding the submissions will be made by early March. First drafts will be due in May with an expected completion date in November 2018. Proposals and questions can be sent to: laura.ugleanjackson@unco.edu.

Call for Chapter: Male Sex Work & Society

(reposted from the SAA Diverse Sexuality and Gender Discussion List)

Archival Research & Male Sex Work

Harrington Park Press is seeking a potential commissioned chapter author who might be interested in archival research in male sex work histories, culture, and lives.

This is for an upcoming Volume 2 companion volume to the 2014 work, Male Sex Work & Society.

Interested persons may send their CV and letter of interest to: <bcohen@harringtonparkpress>

William Cohen
Publisher & Editor-in-Chief
Harrington Park Press, LLC
New York NY

Call for Proposals: Academic Library Impact Research Grants

This is limited to ACRL members.

Call for Proposals 2018

In 2018 the Association of College and Research Libraries (ACRL) has allocated $20,000 to offer grants of up to $3,000 each for librarians to carry out new research in areas suggested by ACRL’s 2017 report Academic Library Impact: Improving Practice and Essential Areas to Research (prepared for ACRL by OCLC Research and available for download or purchase). This program is one of several developed by ACRL’s Value of Academic Libraries (VAL) Committee to support librarians in their efforts to demonstrate the impact of their work to a wider audience.

ACRL invites applications from librarians and information professionals seeking to conduct research that will demonstrate library contributions to student learning and success. The proposed project should aim to build on the foundations of the Academic Library Impact report and fill gaps in existing literature. The committee invites applicants to propose using any investigative methods appropriate to their research questions. These include but are not limited to standard quantitative and qualitative approaches, as well as critical evaluations, case studies, reflective essays, and (auto)ethnography. Proposals that involve collaboration between librarians and other higher education stakeholders, such as institutional researchers, faculty, administration, students, or community partners are also welcome.

Applications are due by 5pm Central Time on April 1, 2018. All applicants will be notified of their status by Friday, May 31, 2018. Grants funds will be disbursed within one month following completion of an agreement form.

It is anticipated that future calls for proposals will be issued in the coming years.

Eligibility

Each applicant must be a member of ACRL and employed as a librarian or information professional in a university, college, community college, or research library at the time of application for the grant.

Grants should not be sought for tuition or other degree-related expenses.

Application Instructions

The application coversheet is available to download here. Please fill it out, save it, and combine it into a single PDF with the other documents detailed below.

The application should be submitted by the principal investigator or project lead. It should include:

1) A completed cover sheet (use application form provided) with your name, contact information, ACRL membership information, and, if applicable, names and contact details of collaborators.

2) Your CV or résumé.

3) A brief abstract of the project (maximum 200 words).

4) Proposed budgetusing the worksheet provided (download .docx file). The budget should total no more than $3,000, unless additional funding has been secured. The budget should itemize costs related to carrying out the proposed research. Possible budget items include: wages for personnel, travel for work on the project, research tools and materials, technology services, and dissemination costs.

a. Indicate whether you have applied for or received any other funding for this project. No additional financial commitments by the institution are required, but they will be weighed in the evaluation of the proposal.
b. Institutional overhead is not an acceptable budget item, nor should it be listed as institutional support.
c. Any costs related to dissemination that are part of the budget should comprise no more than 20% of the total.

5) A project proposal (maximum 1000 words), following the guidelines outlined below.

Proposal Requirements

The proposal should include:

1) Statement of the research objectives and question(s): These should align with at least one of the six priority areas identified in the Academic Library Impact report. Critical perspectives will also be considered.

2) Methodology and analysis strategy for answering the question(s): Identify the methods that will be used, why they are appropriate for addressing the research question(s), and how the results will be assessed.

a. Explain any ethical considerations including how you will protect the rights of participants in your research, if applicable. If your research may be subject to an IRB, address that process here.

3) Planned research activities: This section should contain a detailed description of how the research project will be organized and implemented, including a timeline of activities. These activities should relate to the stated budget. It is expected that the project should be completed within 12 months, though dissemination of results may take longer.

a. If the proposed research constitutes a piece of a larger project, please address how the work funded by this grant fits in and what results will be achieved within the time allotted.
b. For collaborative projects, state how each team member will contribute. Team members may come from different institutions.

4) Expected outcomes and plans for dissemination: This section should describe plans for sharing the results of the project. Grant recipients are required to disseminate their research outputs in a form of their choosing. We strongly encourage that the chosen avenue of dissemination be open access and that it reach a wide audience of stakeholders within higher education.

a. Possibilities include: a conference presentation, a peer-reviewed article, a book or book chapter, a webinar, or a digital project.
b. The ACRL VAL committee will be assembling a special issue of College & Research Libraries and facilitating special sessions at the ACRL 2019 conference for grant recipients. They will invite all interested recipients to submit to those two venues. ACRL also has other avenues for publication that we would be happy to discuss.
c. In any publication or presentation of results, the grantee should acknowledge that support for the project came from ACRL.

5) Benefit of this research: Articulate the significance of this research project in advancing the role of academic libraries within your institution and the wider higher education landscape.

Application Submission

The deadline for receipt of completed applications is 5 p.m. Central Time on April 1, 2018.

Electronic submissions are required. Email a single PDF file of all required documents to Sara Goek, sgoek@ala.org.

Applicants will receive notice of the status of their research grant applications by May 31, 2018 and funds will be disbursed to recipients’ institutions within one month following completion of an agreement form.

Criteria

A subcommittee of members from the VAL Committee will review proposals. In selecting recipients, they will have the following criteria in mind and will seek balance across research questions and institutions.

  • Need for support: Is this monetary support necessary for this research to be undertaken? Is the proposed research original enough to justify funding?
  • Need for research: Will this research help fill an existing gap in the literature? Does it investigate or provide new ways of thinking about the impact of academic libraries? Are the ideas well-conceived, developed, and articulated?
  • Project design: Is the proposed project clear and intriguing? Will the proposed methodology enable effective research? Is it feasible within the proposed timeframe and budget? Are the proposed outcomes realistic?
  • Alignment with objectives: How well does the proposed project align with the priority areas suggested in the Academic Library Impact Report? Or, if this research takes a critical perspective, does the proposal explain how it will further debate in the field and deepen our understanding? How well does it align with the Value of Academic Library goals and objectives as stated in ACRL’s strategic plan?

Obligations

Researchers should expect to provide evidence of the progress and outcomes of their work. Grant recipients must:

  1. Complete and sign an agreement form for funds to be disbursed.
  2. Report on the progress of their research six months into the project.
  3. Disseminate their results within one year of completion.
  4. Provide ACRL with a summary of the research results that may be disseminated online, for example as part of a blog post or other update to the community.
  5. Acknowledge ACRL’s support in any publication or presentation resulting from this research.

Further Information

Resources on designing and conducting research are available on ALA’s LARKS webpage.

See the application frequently asked questions for more details on this program.

If your questions are not answered on the website, please contact ACRL Program Manager and Mellon/ACLS Public Fellow Sara Goek at: sgoek@ala.org or 312-280-5841.