New Book: Women in the Museum: Lessons From the Workplace

From the authors:

Museums are complex workplaces.  Guardians of America’s patrimony, they are simultaneously thought of as traditional, boring and irrelevant, but also progressive, fun and important. With collections and exhibitions lauded and vilified, museums are both significant economic drivers and astoundingly vulnerable organizations.  Collectively United States museums employ nearly 353,000 people, almost half of them women.  There is no denying that most museums are stimulating and wondrous, one-of-a-kind, work environments, but two years ago we could not have imagined the gender inequity lying beneath their placid exteriors.
Women in the Museum explores the professional lives of the field’s female workforce, a cohort that grew exponentially from the late 19th-century to the present. It chronicles the challenges working women in the museum field face today, as well as their responses to widespread entrenched and unconscious gender bias.  In doing so, we hope it clarifies how women’s work in museums is different from men’s, and why we think museums must create, foster and protect a level playing field.
Along the way, we asked ourselves these questions:  Are workplace challenges more acute for women if a field is under-resourced, under-appreciated, or in some instances, under-utilized? How is leadership and internal decision-making different in female dominated museums?  Do public perceptions change toward fields where females make up half or more of the workforce?
It is difficult to write about women in the workplace and not write about diversity, and we have been taken to task for that.  It’s especially difficult in a field that since its founding has been a bastion of white, middle and upper-class men and subsequently women.  While issues of racial and ethnic diversity, sexual orientation, age, physical ability and class are often aligned with gender equity, we’ve chosen to take a bite out of the broadest and most basic of topics in one of the narrowest of fields — an environment almost exclusively nonprofit, under-resourced, and little understood by the public.  Our intent is to pull back the curtain on a long-standing and unresolved gender issue:  equity.  What we’ve written is an opening salvo deserving wider and deeper scrutiny.
We believe museums create communities. Those communities include women as subjects of collections, exhibits and programming, women as audience members and supporters, and as employees.  That said, we would like to suggest that for us diversity is the presumption that everyone has a place at the table. If you think those ideas are remnants of the 1970’s, read on. We believe there is still much work to do. And for us, inclusion as well as equity are what is important, and making sure women are represented is the place to start.

Cal Lee Named New Editor of The American Archivist

The Society of American Archivists is pleased to introduce Christopher A. “Cal” Lee as the next Editor of The American Archivist. Lee, a tenured professor at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (UNC) School of Information and Library Science, will serve a three-year term beginning January 2018. The American Archivist, established in 1938 and published semi-annually, is the premier professional journal in the archives field.

Read more: https://www2.archivists.org/news/2017/unc-professor-cal-lee-is-next-editor-of-the-american-archivist

CFP: Journal for the Society of North Carolina Archivists

Journal for the Society of North Carolina Archivists

Special Topical Issue:   Collecting Communities

Call for Papers

J-SNCA is a peer-reviewed journal that seeks to support the theoretical, practical, and scholarly aspects of the archival profession.

The editorial board of J-SNCA invites members of the research and archival communities to submit articles for a themed issue, Collecting Communities, to be published online in fall 2017.

Today, many in the archival profession are actively working to identify, document, and better serve communities that have been underrepresented, misrepresented, or entirely unrepresented in their collections. Marginalized communities, communities whose histories are documented in non-traditional formats, or communities that primarily exist in the online world all present challenges and opportunities for archivists to collaborate with community members and make archives – both their collections and their services – more inclusive and far-reaching.

This notice is a broad call for papers [shorter articles 1,500-4,000 words in length] that discuss specific ways archives are working to document and collaborate with communities.  We would be particularly interested in articles that discuss the broader lessons and meanings that collecting communities has for the larger archival community.

The deadline for article submission is August 1, 2017. All members of the archival community, including students and independent researchers, are welcome to submit articles.  Contributors need not be members of Society of North Carolina Archivists or live in the state of North Carolina.  Article proposals are welcome and encouraged.

Submission guidelines can be found at http://www.ncarchivists.org/publications/journal-of-the-society-of-north-carolina-archivists-j-snca/manuscript-submission-guidelines/

SAA Book Sale thru May 8

Offer valid April 21–May 8, 2017.  While supplies last.

Books for $15 each . . .

Controlling the Past: Documenting Society and Institutions
List $56 (SAA Members $39.95)

Many Happy Returns: Advocacy and the Development of Archives
List $56 (SAA Members $39.95)

Navigating Legal Issues in Archives
List $69.95 (SAA Members $49.95)

*        *        *

Books for $10 each . . .

Archival Internships: A Guide for Faculty, Supervisors, and Students
List $29.95 (SAA Members $24.95)

Becoming a Trusted Digital Repository (Module 8)
List $29.99 (SAA Members $19.99)

Describing Archives: A Content Standard
List $29.95 (SAA Members $24.95)

College and University Archives: Readings in Theory and Practice
List $54.95 (SAA Members $39.95)

Encoded Archival Description Tag Library – Version EAD3
List $29.95 (SAA Members $24.95)

How to Keep Union Records
List $49 (SAA Members $35)

Managing Congressional Collections
List $19.95 (SAA Members $19.95)

Norton on Archives: The Writings of Margaret Cross Norton on Archival and Records Management
List $45 (SAA Members $35)

Protecting Your Collections: A Manual of Archival Security
List $30 (SAA Members $25)

Waldo Gifford Leland and the Origins of the American Archival Profession
List $62.95 (SAA Members $44.95)

New Issue: Information & Culture

A new issue of Information & Culture is out! Articles in 52-2:

• NORAD’s Combat Operations Center
• Nineteenth-Century Croatian Female Writer Dragojla Jarnević
• Elizabeth Cleveland Morriss, the Literacy and Adult Elementary Education Movement in North Carolina
• The Kinsey Institute’s Sexual Nomenclature: A Thesaurus
• Public Library Movement, the Digital Library Movement, and the Large-Scale Digitization Initiative
• The Internet in Argentina and Brazil

SAA Title in HathiTrust: Film Preservation

Another SAA book has been added to the HathiTrust Digital Library. Film Preservation: Competing Definitions of Value, Use, and Practice by Karen Gracy was published by SAA in 2007 and is now out of print, but you can view it for free by clicking hereFilm Preservation is one of dozens out-of-print books for which SAA has granted full-view permission in the HathiTrust. For a complete list of these open access books, click here. The HathiTrust is a partnership of academic and research institutions, offering a collection of millions of titles digitized from around the world.

New Issue: Journal of Western Archives

The Journal of Western Archives is pleased to announce the availability of a new special issue on web archiving (http://digitalcommons.usu.edu/westernarchives/). This special issue was guest edited by Nicholas Taylor of Stanford University and features the following content:

Articles

Introduction to the Special Issue on Web Archiving
Nicholas Taylor

Developing Web Archiving Metadata Best Practices to Meet User Needs
Jackie M. Dooley, Karen Stoll Farrell, Tammi Kim, and Jessica Venlet

Case Studies

Case Study: Washington and Lee’s First Year Using Archive-It
Alston B. Cobourn

Using RSS to Improve Web Harvest Results for News Web Sites
Gina M. Jones and Michael Neubert

Collaboration Made It Happen! The Kansas Archive-It Consortium
Cliff Hight, Ashley Todd-Diaz, Rebecca Schulte, and Michael Church
We hope you might the content useful.